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neoplatonist

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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2022) 131 (4): 507–510.
Published: 01 October 2022
...Christopher Isaac Noble cinoble@syr.edu Coope Ursula , Freedom and Responsibility in Neoplatonist Thought . Oxford : Oxford University Press , 2020 . 288 pp. © 2022 by Cornell University 2022 What does it mean to be free, and what are the metaphysical conditions...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2002) 111 (2): 305–308.
Published: 01 April 2002
... these philosophers that has not previ- ously been discussed on this scale. The question arises from the comparison of two features of Neoplatonism. (1) For the Neoplatonist philosopher, discursive thinking does not yield knowledge. By discursive thought (dianoia) is meant the kind of thinking we normally...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2002) 111 (2): 302–305.
Published: 01 April 2002
... features of Neoplatonism. (1) For the Neoplatonist philosopher, discursive thinking does not yield knowledge. By discursive thought (dianoia) is meant the kind of thinking we normally practice (cf. 73, 99–102). It has to do with objects external to thought, objects mediated by images derived from sense...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (4): 517–523.
Published: 01 October 2006
.... O’Meara’s title, Platonopolis, refers to the utopian community that third-century- CE Neoplatonist philosopher Plotinus purportedly wished to revive, under the patronage of the Emperor Gallienus, on abandoned land in Campania. Although his project ultimately failed, much like Plato’s ventures...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (4): 524–526.
Published: 01 October 2006
.... O’Meara’s title, Platonopolis, refers to the utopian community that third-century- CE Neoplatonist philosopher Plotinus purportedly wished to revive, under the patronage of the Emperor Gallienus, on abandoned land in Campania. Although his project ultimately failed, much like Plato’s ventures...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (4): 527–529.
Published: 01 October 2006
.... O’Meara’s title, Platonopolis, refers to the utopian community that third-century- CE Neoplatonist philosopher Plotinus purportedly wished to revive, under the patronage of the Emperor Gallienus, on abandoned land in Campania. Although his project ultimately failed, much like Plato’s ventures...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (4): 530–532.
Published: 01 October 2006
... that third-century- CE Neoplatonist philosopher Plotinus purportedly wished to revive, under the patronage of the Emperor Gallienus, on abandoned land in Campania. Although his project ultimately failed, much like Plato’s ventures in Syracuse at the court of Dionysius, the report (credible...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (4): 533–535.
Published: 01 October 2006
... that third-century- CE Neoplatonist philosopher Plotinus purportedly wished to revive, under the patronage of the Emperor Gallienus, on abandoned land in Campania. Although his project ultimately failed, much like Plato’s ventures in Syracuse at the court of Dionysius, the report (credible...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (4): 536–539.
Published: 01 October 2006
... that third-century- CE Neoplatonist philosopher Plotinus purportedly wished to revive, under the patronage of the Emperor Gallienus, on abandoned land in Campania. Although his project ultimately failed, much like Plato’s ventures in Syracuse at the court of Dionysius, the report (credible...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (4): 540–542.
Published: 01 October 2006
.... O’Meara’s title, Platonopolis, refers to the utopian community that third-century- CE Neoplatonist philosopher Plotinus purportedly wished to revive, under the patronage of the Emperor Gallienus, on abandoned land in Campania. Although his project ultimately failed, much like Plato’s ventures...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (4): 543–545.
Published: 01 October 2006
... that third-century- CE Neoplatonist philosopher Plotinus purportedly wished to revive, under the patronage of the Emperor Gallienus, on abandoned land in Campania. Although his project ultimately failed, much like Plato’s ventures in Syracuse at the court of Dionysius, the report (credible...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (4): 546–548.
Published: 01 October 2006
.... O’Meara’s title, Platonopolis, refers to the utopian community that third-century- CE Neoplatonist philosopher Plotinus purportedly wished to revive, under the patronage of the Emperor Gallienus, on abandoned land in Campania. Although his project ultimately failed, much like Plato’s ventures...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2014) 123 (2): 231–234.
Published: 01 April 2014
... the fact that some Neoplatonists thought it required abstinence from particular kinds of food, for example, meat ( Porphyry 2000 , book 1; and Porphyry 1991 , sec. 2). In answer to (ii), Gertz suggests that Plotinus allowed for exceptions (madness, 30–31; slavery and intolerable pain, 32), in contrast...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2023) 132 (2): 301–305.
Published: 01 April 2023
... of Aquinas’s reliance on Neoplatonist sources in preference to Aristotle is particularly useful. Chapter 3 is a bit more tentative and speculative, applying the theory of transcendentals to understand contemplation—something Aquinas himself never explicitly does, as Van Nieuwenhove acknowledges (49...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2012) 121 (2): 285–290.
Published: 01 April 2012
... to aesthetics, opposed to what he considers subjectivism and empiricism, but it should be obvious from his summary description of the position that many of its tenets were common property in the eighteenth century, shared with many Britons, obviously with the Neoplatonist Shaftesbury and his closest...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2012) 121 (2): 291–293.
Published: 01 April 2012
... to what he considers subjectivism and empiricism, but it should be obvious from his summary description of the position that many of its tenets were common property in the eighteenth century, shared with many Britons, obviously with the Neoplatonist Shaftesbury and his closest followers, such as his...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2012) 121 (2): 294–298.
Published: 01 April 2012
..., but it should be obvious from his summary description of the position that many of its tenets were common property in the eighteenth century, shared with many Britons, obviously with the Neoplatonist Shaftesbury and his closest followers, such as his nephew James Harris and the Aberdonian George Turnbull...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2012) 121 (2): 298–301.
Published: 01 April 2012
..., but it should be obvious from his summary description of the position that many of its tenets were common property in the eighteenth century, shared with many Britons, obviously with the Neoplatonist Shaftesbury and his closest followers, such as his nephew James Harris and the Aberdonian George Turnbull...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2012) 121 (2): 302–304.
Published: 01 April 2012
... to aesthetics, opposed to what he considers subjectivism and empiricism, but it should be obvious from his summary description of the position that many of its tenets were common property in the eighteenth century, shared with many Britons, obviously with the Neoplatonist Shaftesbury and his closest...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2012) 121 (2): 304–308.
Published: 01 April 2012
..., shared with many Britons, obviously with the Neoplatonist Shaftesbury and his closest followers, such as his nephew James Harris and the Aberdonian George Turnbull and his student Thomas Reid, but also with the founder of the purported empiricist school of aesthetics, namely, Francis Hutcheson...