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know-wh

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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2015) 124 (4): 441–480.
Published: 01 October 2015
... absolute position essence ignorance know-wh quidditism Sometimes, ignorance is inexpressible . Lewis (2009) recognized this when he argued that we cannot know which property occupies which causal role. As he put it, “We cannot answer the question: which property occupies that role? But worse...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2016) 125 (1): 35–82.
Published: 01 January 2016
... that this semantics overgenerates. Unless we stipulate that ⋄ D , → is ambiguous and that the nonfactualist version appears only in know-how reports, my account also assigns truth conditions involving reference to nonfactualist mental states to other knowledge-wh reports with infinitival complements...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2019) 128 (1): 63–105.
Published: 01 January 2019
...) argues that sentences like, “John knows a doctor that can treat your illness,” have concealed-question readings (in addition to acquaintance readings). I give a more general treatment of these variants in section 5.1. 29. Although these predicates can embed some apparent wh -clauses—e.g., “Sally...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2017) 126 (3): 345–383.
Published: 01 July 2017
... . George B. R. 2013 . “ Knowing-Wh, Mention-Some Readings, and Non-reducibility .” Thought 2 : 166 – 77 . George B. R. , and Phillips Jonathan n.d. “ Non-reducibility with Knowledge-Wh: Experimental Investigations .” Unpublished manuscript . Gibbons John 2001...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2016) 125 (1): 83–134.
Published: 01 January 2016
... an answer to the QUD—that is, that he knows a lot about logic. At the same time, Larry is not committed to this contribution, and moreover there is a possible completion that he believes to be true. It is natural to think that this feature of the example is what exempts Larry from lying. As Saul's account...
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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2017) 126 (1): 1–41.
Published: 01 January 2017
..., knowledge-wh ascriptions are taken to embed wh-questions. The dominant view is that such sentences are true just in case the subject knows a truth that is an adequate answer to the embedded wh-question. 12 If we took these semantic theories to tell us about the nature of knowledge-wh, we would conclude...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2020) 129 (4): 591–642.
Published: 01 October 2020
... the phenomenon is and how it might arise. First, maybe I can only believe H if I know which proposition H is. This might be right, though I have my doubts. 10 Mostly I think the notion of knowledge-“wh” (here, knowledge-“which”) is too context-sensitive in ways that still remain pretty obscure to do...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (3): 413–415.
Published: 01 July 2009
...Stephen Butterfill Lucy O'Brien, Self-Knowing Agents . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. xi + 231. Cornell University 2009 BOOK REVIEWS Christopher Shields, Aristotle. London: Routledge, 2007. xvi + 456 pp. This delightful and fully engaging book...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (3): 375–377.
Published: 01 July 2009
.... By the end of the exercise we have been introduced to such underrated topics as the requirements of concord; the conformity of wills and the inability to know perfectly the will of a friend; the corrosive effects of pride, as well as the salutary effects of hope, on friendship; and in the final two...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (3): 378–381.
Published: 01 July 2009
... this central theme. By the end of the exercise we have been introduced to such underrated topics as the requirements of concord; the conformity of wills and the inability to know perfectly the will of a friend; the corrosive effects of pride, as well as the salutary effects of hope, on friendship...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (3): 381–384.
Published: 01 July 2009
... this central theme. By the end of the exercise we have been introduced to such underrated topics as the requirements of concord; the conformity of wills and the inability to know perfectly the will of a friend; the corrosive effects of pride, as well as the salutary effects of hope, on friendship...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (3): 384–389.
Published: 01 July 2009
... this central theme. By the end of the exercise we have been introduced to such underrated topics as the requirements of concord; the conformity of wills and the inability to know perfectly the will of a friend; the corrosive effects of pride, as well as the salutary effects of hope, on friendship...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (3): 390–392.
Published: 01 July 2009
... this central theme. By the end of the exercise we have been introduced to such underrated topics as the requirements of concord; the conformity of wills and the inability to know perfectly the will of a friend; the corrosive effects of pride, as well as the salutary effects of hope, on friendship...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (3): 393–402.
Published: 01 July 2009
... this central theme. By the end of the exercise we have been introduced to such underrated topics as the requirements of concord; the conformity of wills and the inability to know perfectly the will of a friend; the corrosive effects of pride, as well as the salutary effects of hope, on friendship...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (3): 402–406.
Published: 01 July 2009
... this central theme. By the end of the exercise we have been introduced to such underrated topics as the requirements of concord; the conformity of wills and the inability to know perfectly the will of a friend; the corrosive effects of pride, as well as the salutary effects of hope, on friendship...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (3): 406–409.
Published: 01 July 2009
... this central theme. By the end of the exercise we have been introduced to such underrated topics as the requirements of concord; the conformity of wills and the inability to know perfectly the will of a friend; the corrosive effects of pride, as well as the salutary effects of hope, on friendship...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (3): 409–413.
Published: 01 July 2009
... this central theme. By the end of the exercise we have been introduced to such underrated topics as the requirements of concord; the conformity of wills and the inability to know perfectly the will of a friend; the corrosive effects of pride, as well as the salutary effects of hope, on friendship...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2013) 122 (1): 1–43.
Published: 01 January 2013
... . “ Probabilities of Conditionals and Conditional Probabilities .” In Philosophical Papers 2 , 133 – 56 . Oxford : Oxford University Press . Littlejohn Clayton . 2009 . “ Must We Act Only on What We Know? ” Journal of Philosophy 106 ( 8 ): 463 – 74 . MacFarlane John . 2011...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2013) 122 (4): 577–617.
Published: 01 October 2013
... know), Bob might be taller than he is. (12) If Bob is six foot five, he is taller than he is. Both (9) and (10) are in the category described in the previous paragraph; they express a sensible contrast between the worlds at which Bob is six foot five and the actual world; the indicative mood...