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hedonistic

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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2001) 110 (3): 428–430.
Published: 01 July 2001
...Earl Conee HEDONISTIC UTILITARIANISM. By Torbjörn Tännsjö. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1998. Pp. vi, 185. Cornell University 2001 BOOK REVIEWS The Philosophical Review, Vol. 110, No. 3 (July 2001) HEDONISTIC UTILITARIANISM...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2020) 129 (4): 651–656.
Published: 01 October 2020
... begins by taking up the problem of moral evil and the hedonistic theory of nonmoral motivation underlying it. One challenge Kantians face in this regard is how to explain cases of evil, like suicide bombers, that don't appear to be motivated by a desire for pleasure. Andrews Reath (1989) , among others...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2013) 122 (3): 337–393.
Published: 01 July 2013
... theory. Providing a precise characterization of the teleological/deontological distinction is difficult to do. Nearly everyone agrees that hedonistic act-utilitarianism is a canonical example of a teleological ethical theory and that Kantianism is a canonical example of a deontological ethical theory...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2001) 110 (4): 606–608.
Published: 01 October 2001
...) of the Phenomenology (93), but none of these models are systematically egoistic (even the hedonist “seeks to become one with the other” (96 Hegel’s critique of the extreme, indeed solipsistic ego- ism of the first version of “self-consciousness,” which he calls “desire,” in chap- ter 4 of the Phenomenology...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2005) 114 (2): 253–271.
Published: 01 April 2005
... an opportunity set containing y welfare (“i is at least as well off with x as with y or felt satisfaction (“i is at least as happy with x as with y The tendency of economic theory to conflate these interpretations of preference goes back to its hedonistic origins. If we assume that everyone desires only...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2003) 112 (2): 215–245.
Published: 01 April 2003
... Later, Sidgwick elaborates on the demands of temporal neutrality and notes that it has broader application than its role in his own version of hedonistic egoism. Hereafter as such is to be regarded neither less nor more than Now. It is not, of course, meant, that the good of the present...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2003) 112 (3): 405–409.
Published: 01 July 2003
... of food, drink, and sex. Whether he himself was a philosoph- ical hedonist or not is open to discussion; at any rate, the Cyrenaics who succeeded him are supposed to have accepted a variety of hedonism. But they are also supposed to have accepted something that looks like skepticism: we can have...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2003) 112 (3): 409–413.
Published: 01 July 2003
... thought him “quite undisci- plined” in matters of food, drink, and sex. Whether he himself was a philosoph- ical hedonist or not is open to discussion; at any rate, the Cyrenaics who succeeded him are supposed to have accepted a variety of hedonism. But they are also supposed to have accepted...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2001) 110 (1): 143–150.
Published: 01 January 2001
..., Understanding, and Practice. By Barry Stroud. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. Pp. xviii, 234. Hedonistic Utilitarianism. By Torbjorn Tannsjo. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1998. Pp. vi, 185. Journeys to Selfhood: Hegel and Kierkegaard. Perspectives in Continental...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (2): 169–198.
Published: 01 April 2006
... in criti- cally refl ecting on and evaluating (all of) my desires. Hedonistic reduc- tions fare no better because pleasures, pains, and the like still seem— absent any further story, at least—arbitrary from a normative point of view, the only point of view relevant when my autonomous agency is fully...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2018) 127 (2): 197–224.
Published: 01 April 2018
... for action). 17 Could one value one's particular practical identities on the grounds that they meet one's need for reasons, but not value one's humanity? If some other practical identity prescribes meeting that need, then perhaps it could explain why one values meeting it. For example, a hedonist...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2018) 127 (1): 41–71.
Published: 01 January 2018
..., and will be valid for any way of filling these in. The reason for making the working assumptions is simply heuristic: a concrete instance will be easier to digest and evaluate. But if, for example, the reader endorses classic hedonistic utilitarianism, and a conceptual role that focuses on first-personal...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2014) 123 (2): 173–204.
Published: 01 April 2014
... wholly successful replies. In an appendix, I review some of the textual changes Sidgwick made. Some preliminaries: I ignore the hedonist side of utilitarianism, as Sidgwick does in Methods 3.13. The issue is the argument for consequentialism. I take the axioms presented in 3.13.3 as canonical...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2008) 117 (2): 159–191.
Published: 01 April 2008
... more than an egoistic hedonist must aim directly at pleasure. Indeed, if overtly consequentialist thinking has the problems often claimed of it, then the theory will not so recommend. This is an important insight and a real advance, but the more sophisticated theory accepts the same old account...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (4): 465–500.
Published: 01 October 2009
.... Desire is also connected to pleasure and displeasure. This is not the connection that the psychological hedonists suggested—all sorts of things other than pleasure can be the objects of our desires. The connections between pleasure and desire have to do with our experiences upon hav- ing some vivid...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2010) 119 (2): 201–242.
Published: 01 April 2010
... against its plausibility. 56. The worry described here targets a simple, hedonist version of utilitarianism according to which the only thing that is valuable as an end is pleasurable experience. One might hold a more complicated utilitarian view according to which certain pleasur- able activities...