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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2008) 117 (3): 323–348.
Published: 01 July 2008
... or after. For biological conception is most plausibly seen as a momentous event in the continuing life of a preexisting organism—the egg—rather than a cataclysmic event ending one life and creating another. This article considers and rebuts the most likely challenges to this claim. This metaphysical point...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2008) 117 (1): 1–47.
Published: 01 January 2008
...Sarah-Jane Leslie `Ducks lay eggs' is a true sentence, and `ducks are female' is a false one. Similarly, `mosquitoes carry the West Nile virus' is obviously true, whereas `mosquitoes don't carry the West Nile virus' is patently false. This is so despite the egg-laying ducks' being a subset...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2018) 127 (2): 268–272.
Published: 01 April 2018
... (2-a): (2) a. Platypuses lay eggs.  b. Mammals lay eggs. Although that sentence seems false—one would think that snakes or codfish were better candidates for being egg layers than mammals—Nickel thinks that it is true but seems false because it gives rise to a misleading quantity implicature...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2019) 128 (2): 143–178.
Published: 01 April 2019
... of plenitude will require some restriction to keep troublesome properties—the “bad eggs”—out of the “bases” of modal profiles. That is, there must be some restriction on the membership of the set S of properties partitioned by M . Nonmodal Plenitude, for example, restricts the bases of modal profiles...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2002) 111 (1): 130–132.
Published: 01 January 2002
... than the more typical focus on the ethical decisions of individuals. Also noteworthy is its discussion of genetic technologies that are technologically fea- sible—compared to cloning or the surgical manipulation of genes in a sperm or egg or in an implanted embryo or fetus—such as gene therapy...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2002) 111 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 January 2002
.... Savage uses the example of making an omelet and decid- ing whether to break a sixth egg into a bowl already containing five good eggs, or to break the sixth egg into a saucer and inspect it before adding it to the bowl of eggs, or to discard the sixth egg without inspection. Savage defines an act...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2022) 131 (3): 295–325.
Published: 01 July 2022
... . “ The Egg and I: Conception, Identity, and Abortion .” Philosophical Review 117 , no. 3 : 323 – 48 . Oderberg David . 1997 . “ Modal Properties, Moral Status, and Identity .” Philosophy and Public Affairs 26 , no. 3 : 259 – 98 . Polzin V. J. , Anderson D. L...
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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2022) 131 (1): 111–115.
Published: 01 January 2022
... that the types themselves emerged for that purpose (97, 103, 194). As she herself notes, there is a chicken-and-egg puzzle here (67): types such as gender work to solve coordination problems only if actors are already sufficiently keyed into them to structure their social learning around them; so how can...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2019) 128 (2): 224–228.
Published: 01 April 2019
... typically produce only grubs or eggs, for example, hotter animals like humans give live birth—a more perfect mode of reproduction corresponding to the greater perfection of the species. At the end of chapter 1, then, Leunissen has not yet fully explained the original ethnographic passage from the Politics...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 105–107.
Published: 01 January 2006
... sitting in front of a jar of pickled eggs. Though there are higher-level predicates like ‘wants a pickled egg’ and ‘intends to open the jar’, there are no properties expressed by these predicates. Sentences like ‘I want a pickled egg’ and ‘I intend to open the jar’ are still sometimes true...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 108–112.
Published: 01 January 2006
... overdetermine your behavior, which itself would be a disappoint- ing result for then your mental state would not do any nonredundant work — it would not matter. Monomodism is said to sidestep the issue. Suppose I am sitting in front of a jar of pickled eggs. Though there are higher-level predicates...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 112–115.
Published: 01 January 2006
... overdetermine your behavior, which itself would be a disappoint- ing result for then your mental state would not do any nonredundant work — it would not matter. Monomodism is said to sidestep the issue. Suppose I am sitting in front of a jar of pickled eggs. Though there are higher-level predicates...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 January 2006
... overdetermine your behavior, which itself would be a disappoint- ing result for then your mental state would not do any nonredundant work — it would not matter. Monomodism is said to sidestep the issue. Suppose I am sitting in front of a jar of pickled eggs. Though there are higher-level predicates...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 118–121.
Published: 01 January 2006
... overdetermine your behavior, which itself would be a disappoint- ing result for then your mental state would not do any nonredundant work — it would not matter. Monomodism is said to sidestep the issue. Suppose I am sitting in front of a jar of pickled eggs. Though there are higher-level predicates...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 121–124.
Published: 01 January 2006
... sitting in front of a jar of pickled eggs. Though there are higher-level predicates like ‘wants a pickled egg’ and ‘intends to open the jar’, there are no properties expressed by these predicates. Sentences like ‘I want a pickled egg’ and ‘I intend to open the jar’ are still sometimes true...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 124–127.
Published: 01 January 2006
... overdetermine your behavior, which itself would be a disappoint- ing result for then your mental state would not do any nonredundant work — it would not matter. Monomodism is said to sidestep the issue. Suppose I am sitting in front of a jar of pickled eggs. Though there are higher-level predicates...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 127–131.
Published: 01 January 2006
... sitting in front of a jar of pickled eggs. Though there are higher-level predicates like ‘wants a pickled egg’ and ‘intends to open the jar’, there are no properties expressed by these predicates. Sentences like ‘I want a pickled egg’ and ‘I intend to open the jar’ are still sometimes true...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (1): 131–133.
Published: 01 January 2006
... overdetermine your behavior, which itself would be a disappoint- ing result for then your mental state would not do any nonredundant work — it would not matter. Monomodism is said to sidestep the issue. Suppose I am sitting in front of a jar of pickled eggs. Though there are higher-level predicates...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2024) 133 (1): 87–91.
Published: 01 January 2024
... practice monogamy, but utters, “My husband and I are monotonous.” Or suppose that Sue wants you to know that she loves a certain Fabergé egg but sloppily points to the wrong thing when uttering “I love that.” What would you have to take John or Sue to have said in order for successful communication...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2017) 126 (2): 295–300.
Published: 01 April 2017
... environmental metrics, for instance, some vegan staples may be worse than some animal products—he argues that apples are worse than mussels or eggs in terms of greenhouse gas emissions and water usage—and migrant laborers picking strawberries may be worse off than those who work in animal agriculture. But, he...