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crime

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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2002) 111 (4): 620–624.
Published: 01 October 2002
...David Luban Aleksandar Jokic, ed. War Crimes and Collective Wrongdoing: A Reader. Oxford: Blackwell, 2001. Pp., xiv, 313. Cornell University 2002 BOOK REVIEWS that native endowment is “morally undeserved” and that its distribution is a “common asset...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2013) 122 (4): 647–650.
Published: 01 October 2013
... crimes, to which two chapters are devoted, Boonin holds that a hate crime is worse than the same crime that is merely committed by someone whose commission of that crime is not motivated by racial animus. But consider the case of a group of black women in Arkansas who had a black man lynched...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2017) 126 (4): 541–547.
Published: 01 October 2017
... or moral law. As the authors argue, Morgen's commitment to the former was deep enough to get him into serious trouble. The SS Judiciary was established to try crimes committed by members of the SS, the Waffen-SS, and the Einsatzgruppen. Those crimes included personal enrichment and sexual relations...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2013) 122 (4): 619–639.
Published: 01 October 2013
... a given crime, then your only hope for innocence is that you can prove this person wrong for having so believed. But when God is the believer, this possibility evaporates, and with it your freedom. For you can't prove God wrong for having believed that you would perform an action. And nor could you have...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2002) 111 (4): 618–620.
Published: 01 October 2002
.... THADDEUS METZ University of Missouri–St. Louis The Philosophical Review, Vol. 111, No. 4 (October 2002) Aleksandar Jokic, ed. War Crimes and Collective Wrongdoing: A Reader. Oxford: Blackwell, 2001. Pp., xiv, 313. Genghis Khan is supposed to have said, “Man’s highest joy is victory...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2014) 123 (2): 244–247.
Published: 01 April 2014
... cannot be a necessary condition for institutional legitimacy. Consider that the citizens of the United States are unlikely to autonomously consent to a version of the International Criminal Court (ICC) that could coerce Americans, for example, by punishing them for their war crimes. However...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2023) 132 (4): 633–637.
Published: 01 October 2023
.... That is, an intoxicated actor is not responsible for every crime simply because she is responsible for her intoxication. For instance, she may still lack the mental state for the required criminal act. Criminal law does not treat responsibility as simply an on/off switch, where one loses excuses because of early choices...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2015) 124 (2): 292–295.
Published: 01 April 2015
... that (85). Can there be philosophically sound reasons for retribution? Not in Plato's Laws , argues Malcolm Schofield in “Injury, Injustice, and the Involuntary in the Laws .” By highlighting the difference between treating a crime as injury (which can be voluntary) or as injustice (which cannot...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2005) 114 (2): 227–251.
Published: 01 April 2005
... Mauritius all day. At 2 p.m., Aubrey says to Pullings, 230 MUST WE KNOW WHAT WE SAY? (3) The French will wait until nightfall to attack.11 Consider also the following case of retrodiction: Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson are brought to a crime...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2001) 110 (4): 651–660.
Published: 01 October 2001
... in Crime and Public Policy. By R. A. Duff. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001. Pp. xx, 245. Merit, Aesthetic and Ethical. By Marcia Muelder Eaton. New York: Oxford Uni- versity Press, 2001. Pp. vii, 252. Rule-Following and Realism. 1997. Reprint. By Gary Ebbs. Cambridge: Harvard University...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2014) 123 (1): 112–116.
Published: 01 January 2014
.... If such actions degrade either the dancer or the patron, or lead to secondary effects like crime and drug use, then privacy should be mandated. Touching seems to be an important condition for Allen because “unless the woman is touched or confined, she cannot be overpowered” (91). Situations in which a dancer...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2016) 125 (4): 473–507.
Published: 01 October 2016
...) in the pursuit of some end(s). In Brunswick 1, Carl has decided that he is not willing to spend his life in prison for a crime that he did not commit—thereby forsaking all of his ends that require freedom and participation in society—so that he might do the morally admirable thing. If Dave is to care for Carl...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2021) 130 (1): 159–162.
Published: 01 January 2021
... that the victims of these crimes were justified in resorting to noncivil protest. (Examples of such state injustices surveyed in the book include slavery, lynching, and political violence against African Americans; and denial of asylum to refugees.) But perhaps Delmas could have paid more attention to the sorts...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2022) 131 (4): 537–541.
Published: 01 October 2022
... about whether the defendant in a murder trial is innocent or guilty. Each member of the jury is privy to evidence that the defendant was seen fleeing the scene of the crime with blood spatter on his clothes, but it is grounded in hearsay that, though reliable, was ruled as inadmissible by the judge...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2022) 131 (3): 399–403.
Published: 01 July 2022
... to the argument from the poverty of the stimulus. The moral grammars acquired by all normal children include (but are not limited to) prohibitions of familiar crimes and torts, such as murder, assault, theft, and fraud; principles of justification and excuse, such as self-defense, mistake of fact, duress...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2019) 128 (3): 367–371.
Published: 01 July 2019
...’ clauses (24–28); (2) cases where a single consideration favors some option B over some option A, but favors some further option C over option B (28–36); (3) negative reason existentials (such as “you have no reason to think that I'm the one who committed the crime”) (38–44); (4) cases where you ought...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2015) 124 (1): 119–152.
Published: 01 January 2015
...; if there had been a sensor at X , the epistemic probability for the conditions at X would be degenerate, because the meteorologists would know the actual conditions at X . Finally, consider an example from the social world. The police in a big city wish to forecast crime rates in various neighborhoods...
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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2012) 121 (4): 637–642.
Published: 01 October 2012
.... Gross, Hyman. 2012. Crime and Punishment: A Concise Moral Critique. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Gupta, Anil. 2011. Truth, Meaning, Experience. New York: Oxford University Press. Gustafsson, Martin, and Richard Sørli, eds. 2011. The Philosophy of J. L. Austin. New York: Oxford University...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2005) 114 (2): 291–296.
Published: 01 April 2005
... BOOKS RECEIVED Crimes Against Humanity: A Normative Account. By Larry May. Cambridge: Cam- bridge University Press, 2005. Pp. xiii, 310. Gilles Deleuze: An Introduction. By Todd May. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Pp. ix, 184. Keywords: Experience. The Keywords series...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (2): 243–246.
Published: 01 April 2006
...), the morality of reparations (Bernard Boxill), and self-respect, fair- ness, and living morally (Laurence Thomas). They also address more overtly political concerns, such as white supremacy (Charles Mills), racism in health care (Annette Dula), and the racialization of crime and punishment (Angela Davis...