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beloved

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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 April 2016) 125 (2): 287–289.
Published: 01 April 2016
..., on Brogaard's view, it is an experience (possibly nonveridical) of the body or mind responding to qualities of some object. As the emotion of romantic love specifically, it is an experience of the body or mind responding to the lovable qualities of the beloved (69). These experiences might include...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 April 2003) 112 (2): 135–189.
Published: 01 April 2003
... would be nonrelational features of the person one loves, something about her in her own right. According to the “quality theory,” for example, reasons for love are the beloved’s personal attributes, such as her wit and beauty. In J. David Velleman’s provoca- tive and ingeniously argued proposal, the...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 April 2002) 111 (2): 259–261.
Published: 01 April 2002
... good, ideal motivation, and obligation. In part 2, “Loving the Good,” Adams articulates a Platonic-theistic ideal of motivation centered around love of the Good. His chief aim here is to address the concern that ideal love might be so exclusively concerned with excellence in the beloved that it...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 January 2000) 109 (1): 1–33.
Published: 01 January 2000
... and of the beloved on the black side. It is clear, in such a case, that there is no basis for taking the heart 4The language is reminiscent of Wittgenstein’s picture theory of mean- ing; for insofar as the sentences of the language are like the facts, they will share in the same...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 April 2015) 124 (2): 292–295.
Published: 01 April 2015
... dear to you? Plato, Epicurus, and Epictetus claim that you should not be sad at all; Crantor, Seneca, and Plutarch allow you a little bit of sadness. Taking his cue from Epictetus (339–41), LaBarge defends the first lot, suggesting that you should value each day that your beloved ones are alive, and...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 July 2014) 123 (3): 251–280.
Published: 01 July 2014
... wrote, in a well-known essay, “What is common to all love is this: Your own well-being is tied up with that of someone (or something) you love,” which covers many cases, if not all, but he went on to emphasize the desire for union with the beloved, which applies at most to some ( Nozick 1989 , 68, 70...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 October 2016) 125 (4): 473–507.
Published: 01 October 2016
... remarks about the limits of a friend's selection authority: Now imagine that your partner proposes to undertake an end that you regard as flatly impermissible. . . . Here we run up against a limit on the beloved's authority: the provisional adoption of an impermissible end simply can't generate reasons...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 October 2006) 115 (4): 517–523.
Published: 01 October 2006
... this kind can be analogized to a Hollywood adaptation of some beloved but very complicated novel, whose scenarist has little choice but to drop characters and to simplify motives). In truth, I believe that the harsh reactions these volumes have elicited have been prompted by the author’s zest...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 October 2006) 115 (4): 524–526.
Published: 01 October 2006
... this kind can be analogized to a Hollywood adaptation of some beloved but very complicated novel, whose scenarist has little choice but to drop characters and to simplify motives). In truth, I believe that the harsh reactions these volumes have elicited have been prompted by the author’s zest...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 October 2006) 115 (4): 527–529.
Published: 01 October 2006
... this kind can be analogized to a Hollywood adaptation of some beloved but very complicated novel, whose scenarist has little choice but to drop characters and to simplify motives). In truth, I believe that the harsh reactions these volumes have elicited have been prompted by the author’s zest...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 October 2006) 115 (4): 530–532.
Published: 01 October 2006
... analogized to a Hollywood adaptation of some beloved but very complicated novel, whose scenarist has little choice but to drop characters and to simplify motives). In truth, I believe that the harsh reactions these volumes have elicited have been prompted by the author’s zest for allocating...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 October 2006) 115 (4): 533–535.
Published: 01 October 2006
... analogized to a Hollywood adaptation of some beloved but very complicated novel, whose scenarist has little choice but to drop characters and to simplify motives). In truth, I believe that the harsh reactions these volumes have elicited have been prompted by the author’s zest for allocating...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 October 2006) 115 (4): 536–539.
Published: 01 October 2006
... some beloved but very complicated novel, whose scenarist has little choice but to drop characters and to simplify motives). In truth, I believe that the harsh reactions these volumes have elicited have been prompted by the author’s zest for allocating “accomplishments” and “failures...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 October 2006) 115 (4): 540–542.
Published: 01 October 2006
... this kind can be analogized to a Hollywood adaptation of some beloved but very complicated novel, whose scenarist has little choice but to drop characters and to simplify motives). In truth, I believe that the harsh reactions these volumes have elicited have been prompted by the author’s zest...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 October 2006) 115 (4): 543–545.
Published: 01 October 2006
... analogized to a Hollywood adaptation of some beloved but very complicated novel, whose scenarist has little choice but to drop characters and to simplify motives). In truth, I believe that the harsh reactions these volumes have elicited have been prompted by the author’s zest for allocating...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 October 2006) 115 (4): 546–548.
Published: 01 October 2006
... this kind can be analogized to a Hollywood adaptation of some beloved but very complicated novel, whose scenarist has little choice but to drop characters and to simplify motives). In truth, I believe that the harsh reactions these volumes have elicited have been prompted by the author’s zest...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 January 2000) 109 (1): 63–85.
Published: 01 January 2000
... person would find his attachment to his beloved parents, his spouse and children, his life’s work, and his moral and political causes all open to revision or revocation at any moment, all conditioned by his endorsement every day of the impulses they generate. This interpretation of the...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 April 2014) 123 (2): 205–229.
Published: 01 April 2014
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 October 2006) 115 (4): 415–448.
Published: 01 October 2006
... occurrence of x)(x loves y)’ in ‘(yx)(x loves y)’ is the bondage extension of x)(x loves y)’ with respect to ‘y ’: the characteristic function of the class of beloveds. The sentence is true if and only if this class is universal over the set of people. One may choose to follow Frege in saying...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (1 April 2017) 126 (2): 241–272.
Published: 01 April 2017
... that one will be beyond communication, or one may worry that one will forget the transgression so completely that one would forget to forgive. Particularly interesting cases, I think, arise when one anticipates being unwilling to forgive ex post. Suppose that you see your beloved child poised to do you...