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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2000) 109 (4): 598–601.
Published: 01 October 2000
...Mark Rowlands IN NATURE'S INTERESTS: INTERESTS, ANIMAL RIGHTS, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS. By Gary E. Varner. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. Pp. ix, 154. Cornell University 2000 BOOK REVIEWS plants, fields, and forests, and our garage-variety...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2007) 116 (2): 281–286.
Published: 01 April 2007
...Gary Varner Cass R. Sunstein and Martha C. Nussbaum, eds., Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions . New York: Oxford University Press, 2004. xi + 338 pp. Cornell University 2007 BOOK REVIEWS Allan Gibbard, Thinking How to Live. Cambridge, MA: Harvard...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2021) 130 (4): 619–623.
Published: 01 October 2021
... broadcast mechanism. But the property of being a global workspace is not an all-or-none property. It’s quite likely that many nonhuman animals kind of have a global workspace, but not really . So what should we say in those cases? Given that phenomenal consciousness is an all-or-none concept...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2005) 114 (3): 416–419.
Published: 01 July 2005
...Gary L. Comstock Dale Jamieson, Morality's Progress: Essays on Humans, Other Animals, and the Rest of Nature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. Pp. ix, 380. Cornell University 2005 BOOK REVIEWS world we live in. Swanton argues that responding...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2021) 130 (2): 315–319.
Published: 01 April 2021
...Dale Jamieson Part 2, “Immanuel Kant and the Animals,” explicates and assesses Kant's views regarding animals and revises them in a way that Korsgaard thinks is more in keeping with his theory. According to Kant, humans have moral standing because they are rational, but animals are not rational...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2021) 130 (4): 601–605.
Published: 01 October 2021
...Eliot Michaelson eliot.michaelson@gmail.com Kagan Shelly , How to Count Animals, More or Less . Oxford : Oxford University Press , 2019 x + 309 pp. © 2021 by Cornell University 2021 You’ve just been named to your university’s animal research committee. Keen to prove...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (3): 285–324.
Published: 01 July 2009
... of the position postulate conditions on objective empirical representation that are more intellectual than are warranted. Such views leave it doubtful that animals and human infants perceptually represent elements in the physical environment. By appeal to common sense and to empirical perceptual psychology...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2008) 117 (3): 323–348.
Published: 01 July 2008
...Eugene Mills Suppose you and I are “human beings” in the sense of human animals , members of the genus Homo . Given this supposition, this article argues first and foremost that (it's at least very plausible that) we originated not at the moment of our biological conception but either before...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2017) 126 (2): 295–300.
Published: 01 April 2017
...Bob Fischer Chignell Andrew , Cuneo Terence , and Halteman Matthew C. . Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments about the Ethics of Eating . New York: Routledge , 2016 . x + 299 pp . © 2017 by Cornell University 2017 It's a good time to be in animal and food ethics...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2017) 126 (4): 558–561.
Published: 01 October 2017
... is required for moral responsibility, and the focus has been on humans. There has been little discussion of the freedom of such things as sharks and bats. One might defend this restriction on the ground that nonhuman animals do not have the kind of freedom required for moral responsibility...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2003) 112 (3): 416–419.
Published: 01 July 2003
... forms: animalism (this term is not used by Lowe) and dualism. According to the former, human persons are human animals; according to the latter, human persons are essen- tially immaterial entities. In contrast to the substantival view, represented by what is typically called the psychological...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2019) 128 (2): 224–228.
Published: 01 April 2019
..., a good half of the argument consists of close readings in physics. Aristotle's account of embryology and nutrition in the Parts of Animals and the Generation of Animals are especially important, but Leunissen ranges widely in the scientific corpus and beyond. Notably, she makes substantial excursions...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2020) 129 (3): 465–468.
Published: 01 July 2020
..., for example, the way Aristotle appeals to the principle to explain why snakes are the only blooded land-dweller that lacks legs. He argues that given the length of their bodies and the fact that no blooded animals can move at more than four points of motion, legs would be “in vain” for snakes since they would...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2007) 116 (2): 267–272.
Published: 01 April 2007
... and practical questions. The book is an enormous achieve- ment and required reading for anyone concerned with questions of personal identity, issues of life and death, and the morality governing relations with animals. The detailed nature of the analysis makes for slow reading in many sections...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2007) 116 (2): 273–280.
Published: 01 April 2007
... and practical questions. The book is an enormous achieve- ment and required reading for anyone concerned with questions of personal identity, issues of life and death, and the morality governing relations with animals. The detailed nature of the analysis makes for slow reading in many sections...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2007) 116 (2): 287–293.
Published: 01 April 2007
... and practical questions. The book is an enormous achieve- ment and required reading for anyone concerned with questions of personal identity, issues of life and death, and the morality governing relations with animals. The detailed nature of the analysis makes for slow reading in many sections...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2007) 116 (2): 294–297.
Published: 01 April 2007
... and practical questions. The book is an enormous achieve- ment and required reading for anyone concerned with questions of personal identity, issues of life and death, and the morality governing relations with animals. The detailed nature of the analysis makes for slow reading in many sections...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2007) 116 (2): 297–300.
Published: 01 April 2007
... and practical questions. The book is an enormous achieve- ment and required reading for anyone concerned with questions of personal identity, issues of life and death, and the morality governing relations with animals. The detailed nature of the analysis makes for slow reading in many sections...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2007) 116 (2): 300–303.
Published: 01 April 2007
..., and the morality governing relations with animals. The detailed nature of the analysis makes for slow reading in many sections, but never because the text is unclear. McMahan’s method of argu- ment relies heavily on intuitive judgments in hypothetical cases. However, he believes that not all our...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2007) 116 (2): 303–306.
Published: 01 April 2007
... and practical questions. The book is an enormous achieve- ment and required reading for anyone concerned with questions of personal identity, issues of life and death, and the morality governing relations with animals. The detailed nature of the analysis makes for slow reading in many sections...