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adequate ideas

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Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2016) 125 (2): 205–239.
Published: 01 April 2016
... to solving both problems is Locke's claim that simple ideas are all real, adequate, and true. This explains why, on Locke's view, we have certain knowledge through the senses. It also explains how sensitive knowledge can consist in perceiving an agreement between ideas: perceived agreements among simple...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2010) 119 (4): 531–563.
Published: 01 October 2010
... ideas. As Spinoza writes at 2p29: “The idea of the idea of any affection of the human body does not involve adequate knowl- edge of the human mind.” Spinoza’s point is that, although we are, as a matter of course, conscious of ourselves, we do not, as a matter of course, possess secure self...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2006) 115 (3): 317–354.
Published: 01 July 2006
... be considerably easier (or harder) than they in fact are. The air of implausibility surrounding this claim can be partially dispelled by noting that Spinoza does not mean that one needs to have an adequate idea of the cause in order to have an idea of the effect. How 40. 1d5. 41...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (2): 241–244.
Published: 01 April 2009
... Spinoza’s reader to “move from common and shared conventional linguistic definitions to real defini- tions, and adequate ideas, through a process of emendation” (144). Through an appreciation of the demonstrations in which it is employed, the reader is induced to narrow the range of potential meanings...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (2): 244–247.
Published: 01 April 2009
... Spinoza’s reader to “move from common and shared conventional linguistic definitions to real defini- tions, and adequate ideas, through a process of emendation” (144). Through an appreciation of the demonstrations in which it is employed, the reader is induced to narrow the range of potential meanings...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (2): 247–250.
Published: 01 April 2009
... lexical meaning) and “real” (capturing the essence of a real being) in sequence, allowing Spinoza’s reader to “move from common and shared conventional linguistic definitions to real defini- tions, and adequate ideas, through a process of emendation” (144). Through an appreciation...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (2): 250–253.
Published: 01 April 2009
... Spinoza’s reader to “move from common and shared conventional linguistic definitions to real defini- tions, and adequate ideas, through a process of emendation” (144). Through an appreciation of the demonstrations in which it is employed, the reader is induced to narrow the range of potential meanings...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (2): 253–255.
Published: 01 April 2009
... Spinoza’s reader to “move from common and shared conventional linguistic definitions to real defini- tions, and adequate ideas, through a process of emendation” (144). Through an appreciation of the demonstrations in which it is employed, the reader is induced to narrow the range of potential meanings...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (2): 256–258.
Published: 01 April 2009
... Spinoza’s reader to “move from common and shared conventional linguistic definitions to real defini- tions, and adequate ideas, through a process of emendation” (144). Through an appreciation of the demonstrations in which it is employed, the reader is induced to narrow the range of potential meanings...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (2): 259–261.
Published: 01 April 2009
... Spinoza’s reader to “move from common and shared conventional linguistic definitions to real defini- tions, and adequate ideas, through a process of emendation” (144). Through an appreciation of the demonstrations in which it is employed, the reader is induced to narrow the range of potential meanings...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (2): 261–266.
Published: 01 April 2009
... Spinoza’s reader to “move from common and shared conventional linguistic definitions to real defini- tions, and adequate ideas, through a process of emendation” (144). Through an appreciation of the demonstrations in which it is employed, the reader is induced to narrow the range of potential meanings...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (2): 266–269.
Published: 01 April 2009
... Spinoza’s reader to “move from common and shared conventional linguistic definitions to real defini- tions, and adequate ideas, through a process of emendation” (144). Through an appreciation of the demonstrations in which it is employed, the reader is induced to narrow the range of potential meanings...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (2): 269–273.
Published: 01 April 2009
... Spinoza’s reader to “move from common and shared conventional linguistic definitions to real defini- tions, and adequate ideas, through a process of emendation” (144). Through an appreciation of the demonstrations in which it is employed, the reader is induced to narrow the range of potential meanings...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2009) 118 (2): 273–276.
Published: 01 April 2009
... Spinoza’s reader to “move from common and shared conventional linguistic definitions to real defini- tions, and adequate ideas, through a process of emendation” (144). Through an appreciation of the demonstrations in which it is employed, the reader is induced to narrow the range of potential meanings...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2012) 121 (1): 125–131.
Published: 01 January 2012
... not require adequate but only complete ideas (225). The authors take him to retreat from the confidence of the Meditations that we can know “the ontic structure of the world in terms of substances,” but that is not Descartes’s point. An adequate idea of the mind contains knowledge of everything pertaining...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2012) 121 (1): 131–137.
Published: 01 January 2012
... uncompelling. For instance, in arguing that Descartes retreats from full-blown metaphysical dualism after the Meditations, they misinterpret Descartes’s well-known explanation in the Fourth Replies that his argument for dualism does not require adequate but only complete ideas (225). The authors take him...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2012) 121 (1): 137–139.
Published: 01 January 2012
... explanation in the Fourth Replies that his argument for dualism does not require adequate but only complete ideas (225). The authors take him to retreat from the confidence of the Meditations that we can know “the ontic structure of the world in terms of substances,” but that is not Descartes’s point...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2022) 131 (3): 399–403.
Published: 01 July 2022
...., badness and wrongness) and explains why a descriptively adequate account of them must involve complex, structure-dependent rules (25–46). In part II, Nichols unfolds his core challenge to moral nativism in four detailed and illuminating chapters. Recognizing that the rules that guide moral intuitions...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2005) 114 (1): 33–61.
Published: 01 January 2005
.... According to this line of thought, there are cases in which we would want to say that the subject can acquire knowledge by applying a certain belief source, although she doesn’t know that the source is reliable.9 The other is the idea that the principle is incompatible with externalist...
Journal Article
The Philosophical Review (2019) 128 (2): 143–178.
Published: 01 April 2019
... Plenitude seems initially to capture a lot of what we wanted from the target idea. However, challenges remain. I think these challenges are most helpfully presented as two problems, though, as we'll see, they are very tightly connected. The first is: on pain of incoherence, any adequate formulation...