From Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth to Malcolm X, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Audre Lorde, and bell hooks, the United States has a rich tradition of writers and activists who have drawn attention to anger’s value as a tool for resisting racism. “Racial hatred is real,” hooks (1995: 17) observed a quarter century ago, “and it is humanizing to be able to resist it with militant rage.” Myisha Cherry’s The Case for Rage is a timely and engaging contribution to this tradition. Responding to the deaths of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and others, it invites a new generation of readers to reflect on their anger at racism. The book does not ignore the fact that in day-to-day life anger is often hasty, confused, badly motivated, or poorly expressed. But it points to another form of anger that it argues is insightful, considered, motivated by commitment to the good...

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