Book titles that are intriguing are often uninformative, but the title of this richly rewarding book is an exception. Arindam Chakrabarti’s thesis is that realism about external objects, realism about selves (as subjects of experience), and realism about the existence of other minds (other subjectivities) are interlinked. Using resources drawn from classical Indian metaphysics and epistemology, as well as from recent work in analytic metaphysics, philosophy of language, and philosophy of mind, he mounts a robust and sophisticated defense of widely shared commitments on all three topics. But there is another theme as well. The metaphysics of the Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika school of Brahminical Indian philosophy is built around a system of seven categories: substance, property-particular (trope), action, universal, individuator, inherence, and absence. Other Indian systems sought to get by with far fewer categories, and much recent work in metaphysics has followed suit. This book may be seen as a sustained argument...

You do not currently have access to this content.