Calls for a “nonideal turn” in political philosophy are increasingly common in the field. Political philosophers are repeatedly asked to step out of their ivory towers and get their hands dirty with the real moral and political crises that surround them. These calls are not surprising, given the dysfunctionality of politics in many states of the world—including prospering democracies—and the bleak promises their futures hold. But the task of doing nonideal theory, which involves translating abstract concepts and ideals into political principles for our messy reality, is far from straightforward.

A Duty to Resist is a prime example of how to execute this task. Candice Delmas's analysis of the grounds and scope of citizens’ duty to resist injustice is philosophically sound and written for the political reality of our time. She engages with complex ideas and advances controversial claims, but remains engaging and accessible....

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