This book is about, and more precisely against, time biases. Time biases involve caring about when certain things happen as such. One kind of time bias is familiar and almost universally condemned, namely, the preference for good things to happen sooner and bad things later, even at the cost of a worse overall ratio of goods to bads. This is near bias. But as the plural in the book’s title suggests, there are others: future bias (preferring that good things be in the future and bad things in the past), structural bias (caring about the overall sequence of events in your life; think of the preference for a life that starts out bad but continually improves over a life that starts out good but gradually declines), and meaning bias (caring about when you live in relation to other events). To my knowledge,...

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