Ought we think of time A-theoretically—with events being present, past, or future, and time essentially involving passage? Our experiences suggest as much, a standard rationale behind the A-theory goes. Like others, Simon Prosser demurs. What makes Experiencing Time noteworthy is the sophistication with which Prosser evaluates different strategies for resisting such considerations from experience, the development of several new and promising suggestions, and the boldness of some of these. The book surveys various types of temporal experiences more generally, some of which go beyond the dispute between A- and B-theorists—the selective summary to follow won't do justice to the richness of Prosser's discussion.

Chapter 1 begins with a comprehensive introduction—one of the most helpful I've seen lately—to the central metaphysical issues separating different versions of the A- and B-theory. A small quibble is terminological: through the book, it matters exactly what the “dynamic character” of experience (28)...

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