Justin Snedegar's book Contrastive Reasons is a deft, lean, and elegant explication and defense of contrastivism about reasons (henceforth, just ‘contrastivism’). The idea behind contrastivism can be explained and motivated by thinking about simple cases like the following. I am trying to decide what to do tonight, and I have a splitting headache. Is the fact that I have a headache a reason for me to spend my evening reading? Well, that's tricky. It seems true that the fact that I have a headache is a reason for me to spend my evening reading rather than clubbing. But it doesn't seem true that it is a reason for me to spend my evening reading rather than knitting. But is it a reason to spend my evening reading, simpliciter? According to Snedegar's view, that last question rests on a mistake. Quite generally,...

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