In 1997, a collection of essays was published by Linda Kerber called Toward an Intellectual History of Women. The current volume advertises itself as part of the related project of detailing the contribution made by women to the history of philosophy. In reading the essays collected in it, I could not help but feel that, without more progress toward an intellectual history of women, as anticipated by Kerber, no genuinely interesting account of the women's contribution to the history of philosophy can emerge. Progress in evaluating the social and political philosophy of Wollstonecraft requires a deeper understanding of both the intellectual history of her period, and of women's considerable contribution to it, than is typically demonstrated in these essays.

Those who have been trained as philosophers in the Anglo-American tradition during the past half century have been inculcated into an academic culture that rather...

You do not currently have access to this content.