Mark Fedyk argues persuasively for both the importance and the perils of interdisciplinarity in studies of ethical life. The book is dense with incisive argumentation and innovative proposals for integrating moral, social, and political philosophy with the psychological and social sciences. It will be of interest to aprioristically inclined normative and social theorists peeking over the fence at the empirical side of things, to experimentalists trying to operationalize or intervene on real-world ethical thought and action—and to everyone in between.

The early chapters aim to place some of the most common pitfalls of contemporary moral psychology into theoretical context. Fedyk takes issue, in particular, with the fervor for positing universal and innate moral-cognitive modules solely on the basis of speculations about what would have been adaptive for our ancestors. The problem with this inference, of course, is that numerous alternative, equally plausible psychological (and...

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