After her well-known and influential first book on Kant, Kant and the Capacity to Judge (published in English in 1998), and Kant on the Human Standpoint (2005), I, Me, Mine is Béatrice Longuenesse's third major monograph on Kant. With this new book, however, she aims to widen the scope beyond mere Kant scholarship. Kant is framed within a broader effort to answer the more general question that has been at the forefront of debates in “recent analytic philosophy of language and mind,” namely, the question, “What is self-consciousness, and in what ways does it relate to our use, in language and in thought, of the first-person pronoun ‘I’?” (1). In her attempt to answer this question, Longuenesse links Kant's views on self-consciousness to insights from central figures in analytic philosophy of mind such as Wittgenstein, Gareth Evans, G. E. M. Anscombe, and Sidney Shoemaker...

You do not currently have access to this content.