The Minority Body is an important and provocative book. It moves disability further into the center of philosophical debates about well-being, harm, and group identity with bold, original arguments; clear, engaging writing; and vivid, concrete examples. Although much of the book is drawn from previously published articles, their integration suggests a unified philosophical project. Those articles have already begun a philosophical conversation continued in the book and its early reviews. After a brief summary, I will join that conversation, focusing on the earlier, more foundational parts of the book and occasionally referring to previous critiques.

Barnes challenges the superficial consensus that has emerged in response to a generation of disability scholarship: that disability should be seen as an interaction between a biological impairment and the physical and social environment; that disability is not (usually) a tragedy, just a misfortune compounded by stigma and injustice;...

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