In recent years the renewed interest in pre-Kantian German Enlightenment has transformed our picture of that period, shedding light on previously neglected authors, who now emerge as significant for Kant's development and for our understanding of eighteenth-century philosophy. In his historically sensitive and contextualist reading of Kant's rational psychology, Corey Dyck follows the lead of scholars like Michael Friedman (Kant and the Exact Sciences, 1992), Martin Schönfeld (The Philosophy of the Young Kant: The Precritical Project, 2000), and Eric Watkins (Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality, 2005), who have demonstrated the philosophical benefits of interpreting Kant against the German philosophical background of his time. Dyck's book exemplifies the ongoing interest in the Paralogisms and joins a series of works on the topic, from Karl Ameriks's Kant's Theory of Mind (2000) to Henry Allison's Kant's Transcendental Idealism (2004) and...

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