Cameron and Stainton's edited volume is a welcome addition to an understudied area of the history of philosophy. Any reader is sure to come away with a deeper understanding of, and appreciation for, the sophisticated approaches that one finds throughout philosophical history to perennial issues in the philosophy of language. I recommend it not just to those interested in the history of philosophy but also to those interested in solutions to puzzles in the philosophy of language that are often quite different than those commonly pursued today.

The volume is ambitious in its historical breadth; collectively, the contributed articles range over a period of nearly 2,400 years. Despite covering figures as historically diverse as Plato and Anton Marty, however, the volume's editors argue that two topics repeatedly emerge: first, the kind(s) of linguistic content that a historical figure or period considered and, second, their...

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