In deference to the extraordinary richness and dialectical subtlety of the Tractatus, José Zalabardo does not attempt a comprehensive treatment of the work. Instead, he focuses on two topics of unquestioned centrality: representation and reality. As it seems to me, he interprets what the Tractatus has to say—or apparently say—about representation more satisfactorily than its pronouncements about reality. It is not clear, however, to what degree this amounts to a criticism of Zalabardo's approach. For he denies that “faithful interpretation of Wittgenstein's thought” is his ultimate goal (9). In keeping with this disavowal, he claims license to develop the arguments he attributes to Wittgenstein “at a level of detail that goes beyond what the evidence could sustain” (9). In practice, however, Zalabardo does not merely develop certain nascent lines of Tractarian thought. His readings, while inventive and interesting, sometimes positively run counter to...

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