The thesis of this book is expressed by its title and subtitle: well-being consists in “happiness in a worthwhile life.” Badhwar means by this, not that it has two separate components—happiness on the one hand, what is worthwhile on the other—but that it is a single integrated whole. That is, for a life to be prudentially valuable (good for the individual whose life it is) is for it to contain a certain psychological state (happiness, a sense of fulfillment, positive feelings) directed at what has objective worth. Happiness and worth come in degrees, so I take her to mean that the greater the feeling of happiness one has, the better off one is—provided that one finds one's happiness in what is worthwhile. Similarly, the greater the worthwhileness of the things one has in one's life, the better off one is—provided one is also made...

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