There is no doctrine more central to Kant's philosophy, nor one more confusing in its fundamental workings, nor one more contested within the reception, than transcendental idealism. In Manifest Reality,1 Lucy Allais develops an interpretation of the doctrine that manages to be genuinely novel and philosophically level-headed, while still rendering Kant's idealism sufficiently radical to have provoked all the controversy in the first place. The book's basic procedure is admirable. Allais begins with a measured, fair-minded analysis of previous interpretations that brings out why the leading approaches—which have either treated Kant as a phenomenalist about the objects of our knowledge, or attempted to deflate the metaphysical implications of his idealism altogether in favor of strictly epistemological points—have each had so much difficulty with central features of the textual evidence. She then uses that analysis to identify constraints on any satisfactory interpretation.

Those...

You do not currently have access to this content.