This festschrift for Julia Annas contains fifteen papers (six on Plato, one on Aristotle, four on the Stoics, and four on eudaimonism), all of which deal with aspects of virtue and happiness, the central topic of Annas's wide-ranging work. The editor, in her helpful introduction, summarizes the papers judiciously and explains how they relate to Annas's work. As is befitting for the occasion, many of the papers engage critically with Annas's often seminal contributions to the topics: this festschrift is not a eulogy, but a lively philosophical dialogue with Annas.

Two papers deal with Plato's epistemology. In “Socrates’ Refutation of Gorgias: Gorgias 447 C–461 B,” Mark L. McPherran brings out nicely the steps of Gorgias's refutation by focusing on the difference between philosophy and rhetoric. The difference is not the method—both use rational and nonrational means of persuasion—but the goal: philosophy but not rhetoric...

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