This volume is a collection of eleven essays, nine of which are published for the first time. (Eric Watkins's essay first appeared in 2009, and much of Andrew Chignell's contribution reproduces material covered in two of his earlier papers from 2008 and 2010.) As the title of the volume suggests, the included articles are thematically unified in that they all concern aspects of what one might call “Kant's moral metaphysics,” that is, his views about the nature of, and our access to, the supersensible as developed in the context of his practical philosophy. The book is divided into five sections devoted to the following more specific topics: moral motivation and moral metaphysics, freedom, the highest good, epistemology and the supersensible, and epistemology and religion. There is not enough space in this review to discuss the papers in detail. Accordingly, I will restrict myself to briefly summarizing each of them and...

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