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unionist

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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1974) 73 (1): 70–84.
Published: 01 January 1974
...Gary L. Williams Copyright © 1974 by Duke University Press 1974 Lincoln s Neutral Allies: The Case of the Kentucky Unionists Gary L. Williams When war split the American nation in 1861, the people of Ken­ tucky found themselves, emotionally as well as physically, in an uncomfortable middle...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1912) 11 (4): 363–376.
Published: 01 October 1912
..., and in no case do these party divisions based on the questions of the day coin­ cide with the lines that divide Unionists, Liberals, Nationalists, and Laborites from each other. The advocacy of Home Rule by the Nationalists constitutes, perhaps, the only exception to this statement. It is scarcely conceivable...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1913) 12 (4): 356–368.
Published: 01 October 1913
... alike been unable to solve. Each generation has had to work out a new Irish policy because the generation before had failed. In our own time the idea of gov­ erning Ireland in accordance with Irish ideas has taken form in such measures as the land and local government acts with the Unionist party...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1911) 10 (4): 356–376.
Published: 01 October 1911
... is purely an adjunct of the Unionist party, and is of little use except to hinder a Liberal administration at the discretion of the Unionist leaders. As long as the House of Lords retained the powers which legally belonged to it before the passage of the Parliament Act of 1911, a Liberal administration...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1910) 9 (4): 303–319.
Published: 01 October 1910
..., Conservative and Liberal, though the latter was composed of a Whig and a Radical branch. The question of home rule for Ireland caused a realignment, and in the Parliament of 1886 there were 316 Conservatives, 192 Liberals or followers of Gladstone, 77 Liberal Unionists, former Liberals who were opposed to Home...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1999) 98 (3): 501–537.
Published: 01 July 1999
... is not, as the common interpretation has it, a conflict between Catholic and Protestant (or between nationalist and unionist), but rather one within Protestant identity itself. In this respect, even if not in others, Paulin s work displays some unexpected similarities with those by Ervine and Thompson. St. John Ervine...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1914) 13 (3): 260–269.
Published: 01 July 1914
... and was Unionist in tendency. By great exertion they had carried the state for the Bell-Everett, the Union party, in the election of 1860. But, however these parties might differ, they were generally united upon the state-rights principles with which Virginia was so thoroughly imbued. This is shown quite...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1974) 73 (1): 10–22.
Published: 01 January 1974
... and 1840 s Unionist orators denied that the South must resort to drastic action. But by i860 the voice of pro­ test against a dominant Southern mind was faint, and the course of the South to secession seemed set. An examination of the Fourth of July orations in Charleston between 1778 and i860 shows...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1972) 71 (1): 16–29.
Published: 01 January 1972
... themselves impaled on the horns of a dilemma, with Protestant-Unionists on the right and Catholic-Republicans on the left. The former insist upon the social and economic status quo, with retention of a place in the United Kingdom. The latter demand social and economic reform as well as reunification...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1996) 95 (1): 227–276.
Published: 01 January 1996
... of the British government and was finally settled along lines which essen­ tially reflected the balance of coercion then prevailing between British forces and Northern Irish unionists, on the one side, and Irish nationalists, on the other. The settlement ratified in 1925 took little account ofthe inter­ ests...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1907) 6 (4): 387–392.
Published: 01 October 1907
... at the extension of executive activity in Lincoln s and Johnson s plans for restoration, feared that a new party composed of liberal Unionists and conservative Democrats would, underJohnson s leadership, sweep the country. Public opinion in the North, however, was with the President until the sporadic appearance...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1951) 50 (4): 478–498.
Published: 01 October 1951
... completed the list. The critical nature of the election led to the adoption of 1868 candidates, nearly 100 more than the previous high in 1929. Of the 625 seats, Labor left uncontested only that of the Speaker in Northumberland and 5 of the 12 in Unionist Ulster. This complete geographical coverage together...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1978) 77 (4): 538–539.
Published: 01 October 1978
... generalistic ap­ proach leads to distortion or omission. In his discussion of Lloyd George s negotiations with the Irish in 1916 he alludes to Sir Edward Carson as a leader of the southern Unionists, a recognition never accorded to the Ulster leader. Moreover the author neglects to point out the crucial tie...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1978) 77 (4): 537–538.
Published: 01 October 1978
... discussion of Lloyd George s negotiations with the Irish in 1916 he alludes to Sir Edward Carson as a leader of the southern Unionists, a recognition never accorded to the Ulster leader. Moreover the author neglects to point out the crucial tie which developed in this instance between the southern Unionists...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1970) 69 (1): 124–143.
Published: 01 January 1970
... Whigs who favored John C. Breck­ inridge in 1860. Students of the Southern Whig party in its original, as contrasted with its persistent, period have noted direct links ex­ tending from the Whigs through the Americans to the Constitutional Unionists; but they have also observed, beginning in 1850...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1967) 66 (2): 131–147.
Published: 01 April 1967
.... The Conservatives and their Ulster Unionist allies now entered candidates in all 630 constituencies except that of the speaker, a traditional courtesy. Labour contested all seats in Great Britain, while in Northern Ireland the Northern Ireland Labour party fought 4 of the 12 seats, most of which were heavily Ulster...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1959) 58 (2): 185–195.
Published: 01 April 1959
.... The attitudes of Australian unions to the arbitration system have always been mixed. Unions which had become strong without arbi­ tration have been restive under the limitations it places upon their freedom of action. Leftist unionists have always opposed the con­ cession to constitutional procedures involved...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2020) 119 (3): 629–636.
Published: 01 July 2020
... of impediments for developing their union work. Women workers are usually accompanied by farm overseers in public places, making it di™cult for them to speak to unionists or even pick up a ier. There is signicant social collusion with the strawberry companies and it is dangerous to openly position oneself...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1971) 70 (3): 350–364.
Published: 01 July 1971
... of a spring or fall election by an­ nouncing June 18 as the date. At the dissolution of Parliament, Labour held 346 seats, Con­ servatives 263, Liberals 13, and others (including the nonvoting speaker) 6, while two seats were vacant. The Conservatives and their Ulster Unionist allies now entered candidates...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1933) 32 (1): 1–8.
Published: 01 January 1933
.... But Trotsky rallies the workers the trade unionists and women serve the machine guns. The streets are barricaded until southern Leningrad becomes a near-fortress. The workmen are adepts at street fighting. A Red rifle regiment flees, and Trotsky rallies them on a spirited horse to which he is ill-accustomed...