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religious communities

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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2000) 99 (1): 79–96.
Published: 01 January 2000
...Elena Chernolutskaya 2001 by Duke University Press 2001 Translated by Julia Trubikhina Elena Chernolutskaya Religious Communities in Harbin and Ethnic Identity of Russian Emigrés The atmosphere of religious and national tol- erance...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2014) 113 (2): 396–406.
Published: 01 April 2014
... of converging vectors of diverse social protest movements over the previous decades involving urban intelligentsias, disaffected educated youth, blue- and white-collar workers and professionals, and marginalized religious communities and regions. © 2014 Duke University Press 2014 References...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2014) 113 (1): 37–62.
Published: 01 January 2014
.... In denying the existence of a rational—“unencumbered,” “buffered”— self capable of choosing its own ends and by insisting on the “ascriptive,” “traditional,” and communal character of religious identities, communitar- ian and Catholic histories of the confessional churches might be expected to better...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2019) 118 (1): 23–40.
Published: 01 January 2019
... . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press . Islam religious communities AKP political economy of religiosity Copyright © 2019 by Duke University Press 2019 ...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2009) 108 (4): 689–699.
Published: 01 October 2009
... to the concept and the practice: (1) instrumentalization, (2) contingency, (3) authoritarian administration, (4) abuses of the national security state, (5) administration restrictions on the use of communication technology, (6) unwarranted research oversight, (7) neoliberal assaults on academic disciplines, (8...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2014) 113 (1): 109–128.
Published: 01 January 2014
... authoritarianism in the west. . . . It was religious community, rather than religious authority, which mattered in the Indian context” (Engineer 1995: 40; see also, e.g., Gajendragadkar 1966: 4; Ganguly 2003: 11; T. N. Madan 1993: 667; Jacobsohn 2005). Kapur...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2005) 104 (2): 329–336.
Published: 01 April 2005
... Europaeum— we might see that the origins of the modern interstate system lie anywhere but in the idea of the nation as a new universal (rational, bourgeois) sub- stitute for religious community. Anderson’s thesis that nationalism itself had been invented in Spanish America and was subsequently exported...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2000) 99 (4): 963–967.
Published: 01 October 2000
... Chernolutskaya, Elena, Religious Communities in Harbin and Ethnic Identity of Russian Emigrés  6482 SOUTH ATLANTIC QUARTERLY 99:4 / sheet 352 of 354 Ching, Leo, ‘‘Give Me Japan and Nothing Else Postcoloniality, Identity, and the Traces...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2001) 100 (1): 171–214.
Published: 01 January 2001
... in the life of the religious community she led.This ceremony and the priority given to it in her Opô Afonjá temple appear to ritualize and dramatize the very same purity that traveler Martiniano do Bonfim and Ilê Axé Opô Afonjá’s...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2001) 100 (4): 855–867.
Published: 01 October 2001
... in different religious communities, Renteln claims that the surviv- ing relatives of the dead—if not the dead themselves—have a right to have their religious beliefs upheld in matters concerning the dead. The two types of cases...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2014) 113 (1): 129–159.
Published: 01 January 2014
... collaborators and informants for the state of Israel. While Bahai community and religious property was seized, most ordinary Bahais continued to con- duct their daily affairs in Egypt unless they had to go before the courts to settle particular kinds of claims in which their religious identity was conse...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2003) 102 (2-3): 433–451.
Published: 01 July 2003
... with modernization and secularization. The term millet desig- nates the religious community in the Ottoman language; the modern term for nation, ulus, prevents the connotations of belonging to the Muslim com- munity (ümmet) that the Ottoman term implies. In building the nation- state in Turkey, nationalism has...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2014) 113 (1): 9–35.
Published: 01 January 2014
... awaited the founding of settle- ments in the American colonies by communities of believers, whose radi- cal Christian individualism partly contributed to their exile from European states. Their political community was a “religious community, exercising inherent rights derived from God and recorded...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2003) 102 (2-3): 333–350.
Published: 01 July 2003
... usage still seriously conveys its core original affiliation with the nonclerical, but still religious, members of a community of believers. By contrast, because of the core contradistinction it conveys between belong- ing to the world/worldly/temporal matters, on the one hand, and belonging...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2002) 101 (4): 955–986.
Published: 01 October 2002
..., Gandhi stipulates, ‘‘Ashram here means a religious community Then, toward the end of the book, after an extended discussion of ashram practices, he remarks, ‘‘Last, when you have observed these rules, think that then, and not till then, you may come to politics and dabble in them to your heart’s...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2010) 109 (4): 653–676.
Published: 01 October 2010
... of modern biblical interpretation as a historically reductive, literalist project divorced from the context of religious community and the history of religious interpretation. Yet it pos- sesses a certain resonance for those in biblical studies who have for several decades pointed out...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2011) 110 (4): 885–900.
Published: 01 October 2011
... of the forest the massacre took place, “There were graves everywhere, people told me, the woods were full of bodies. They were Finnish soldiers and Rus- sian partisans, Civil War graves and the lost cemeteries of older settlers, religious communities, peasant homesteaders, deserters.”45 The country...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2006) 105 (3): 617–636.
Published: 01 July 2006
... and ways of thinking and behaving that are normal for this particular com- munity and are regarded as the only possible ones. Such a culture allows a person to see himself and others only as members of the tribe, of the social or religious community, not as independent human beings. On the one hand...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2002) 101 (4): 987–1014.
Published: 01 October 2002
... and religious reform. Both Harishchandra and Dwivedi played important roles—albeit at different times—in the literary public sphere of the North- west Provinces, which was centered in Banares. Sudhir Chandra has analyzed the social formation of this literary circle, which drew to itself most of Hindi’s...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2003) 102 (2-3): 453–470.
Published: 01 July 2003
...- tions among fellow townsmen, neighbors, religious or ethnic community members, or within mafia-like organizations formed to realize illicit gain for their members. This theoretical approach guides Polanyi’s account of the nineteenth- century market economy as a unique and unnatural phenomenon incom...