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meiji

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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1988) 87 (3): 591–613.
Published: 01 July 1988
... literary history, in which case the discourse of literary criticism will have demonstrated its ability to both ignore and outlive his text. He provides the additional information that he conceived of the book while attending a seminar in the literature of the Meiji period (that of Japan s initial...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1988) 87 (3): 645–650.
Published: 01 July 1988
...). The leading enlightenment writer of the Meiji period and the founder of Keio University. Introduced Western knowledge into Meiji Japan and argued consistently for Japan s need to Westernize. Major works in translation: An En­ couragement of Learning and An Outline of a Theory of Civiliza­ tion. Hakone...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1993) 92 (2): 295–310.
Published: 01 April 1993
... on it. This is the first reason for its claims on us: it is not even an alternate history which is offered us by this postmodern analysis of the institutions of the modern self, writing, literature, and scientific objectivity that were constructed and imposed by the Meiji Revolution. Rather, it is as though that great...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1988) 87 (3): 445–474.
Published: 01 July 1988
... with history, despite the effort to represent the historical as the succession of reason and progress, and to make it appear orderly. The debaters concentrated on one further issue. In interrogating the meaning of civilization, identified with the Meiji achievement, par­ ticipants like Kamei Katsuichiro...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1988) 87 (3): 615–628.
Published: 01 July 1988
...Karatani Kōjin Karatani Kojin One Spirit, Two Nineteenth Centuries ^Rie Japanese nineteenth century belongs unequivocally to the age of Edo (1600-1867). Notwithstanding the rapid economic and po­ litical transformations brought about by the Meiji restoration of 1868, Japanese tastes and ways...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1943) 42 (4): 338–346.
Published: 01 October 1943
... be eliminated from further political power in Europe. Must the same policy be adopted towards the present Emperor of Japan? To answer that question we must bear in mind that while Hitler dominates, the Emperor of Japan is en­ tirely dominated. Except for the comparatively short Meiji period (1868-1912), after...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1988) 87 (3): 401–418.
Published: 01 July 1988
... the beginning of the Meiji era (e.g., Fukuzawa Yukichi on physics) were translated into Japanese through the assignment of ideographic equivalences. Japanese self-consciousness expressed itself with a primary reference to continuous culture and not to technological work the latter, in the final analysis...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1988) 87 (3): 525–550.
Published: 01 July 1988
... a literature of decadence, is at the same time an expression of resis­ tance and criticism, however modest its scale and impact. Its playful sophistication contains at least potential traits of postmodernity. The second stage in the history of the shdsetsu (i.e., telling tales) is from the mid-Meiji era...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2000) 99 (4): 741–762.
Published: 01 October 2000
... National Subjectivity and the Uses of Atonement 745 by history textbook reform The organization attacks textbooks, especially middle-school texts, that ‘‘depict the nation-state formed during the Meiji Restoration asevilandcondemn...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2000) 99 (4): 789–818.
Published: 01 October 2000
... referred to as a translation of nationality from British liberalism. During the early years of the Meiji period some intellectuals argued that the figure of the emperor represented the sense of nationality.Yet...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2000) 99 (4): 841–864.
Published: 01 October 2000
... in the first decade of the twentieth century. Each night contains a ‘‘dream which is in effect an allegory of a range of modern concerns as seen by Sōseki standing in this late Meiji moment. In the third night (of dream), a ‘‘father...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1988) 87 (3): 505–523.
Published: 01 July 1988
..., there­ fore, that his historical works bear most provocatively on modernity and subjectivity. The most important of them is entitled Fukuzawa Yukichi no tetsugaku ( The Philosophy of Fukuzawa Yukichi11 Maruyama s study of the late nineteenth-century thought of the Meiji period publicist Fukuzawa...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2000) 99 (4): 819–840.
Published: 01 October 2000
... the notion of mon- strosity in relation to children in Japan. Historian Gerald Figal has written a revelatory book about monsters in Meiji Japan (although not about the dimensions of monstrosity...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2000) 99 (4): 715–740.
Published: 01 October 2000
... every bit as Japanese as the Meiji Constitution, whose language may have been originally Japanese but whose form and even content were not. What this alibi allows Katō and others who have followed its logic to affirm is the present...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1928) 27 (2): 215–227.
Published: 01 April 1928
... dignity, and of even greater discrimination and understanding. Henry Commager. New York University. A Study of Shinto, the Religion of the Japanese Nation. By Genchi Kato. Tokyo: Meiji Japan Society, 1926. 256 pp. When on the Emperor s birthday the photograph of His Majesty is unveiled before the children...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1988) 87 (3): 571–589.
Published: 01 July 1988
... to glimpse the inside of oppression and struggle. In this way, like Kojeve, he can present to us a reproduction of a photograph of the famous General Nogi Maresuke and his wife prior to their double suicide (in the wake of the Emperor Meiji s death) and tell us that they knew that they were going to take...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2000) 99 (1): 121–142.
Published: 01 January 2000
..., whom the Japanese first approached, had refused to take the helm of BREM. When the agents of the Kempeitai came to reiterate their offer, he greeted them on his steps sporting the decoration that the Meiji emperor had given him when he was gover- nor of the Maritime Province...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2001) 100 (2): 465–482.
Published: 01 April 2001
... and editing (e.g., Robert Rosenstone’s Mirror in the Shrine: American Encounters with Meiji Japan), or with the distinction between historical and fictional dis- courses, as in Simon Schama’s Dead Certainties (Unwarranted Speculations...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2000) 99 (1): 219–240.
Published: 01 January 2000
... in the appearance of Tan’gun. Since history was the record of the minjok, nothing existed prior to its emergence, here equated with Tan’gun. If in China historians were rediscovering Huangdi, and if in Japan the Meiji state had used Amaterasu to define the imperial line...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1999) 98 (1-2): 143–162.
Published: 01 January 1999
... wai zhidi thereby opening the door to Meiji Japan s conquest and colonization of the island in the name of maritime security.18 Tao Qian s account of journeys to utopian lands defined the mode by which all subsequent undertakings of this nature were to be narrated in the Chinese tradition. In 1697...