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marat

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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1926) 25 (2): 154–167.
Published: 01 April 1926
...Louis R. Gottschalk Copyright © 1926 by Duke University Press 1926 The Criminality of Jean Paul Marat Louis R. Gottschalk University of Louisville History is doubly complex because it is both art and science. Were it art alone, the sense of beauty would be enough to dis­ tinguish good history...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1927) 26 (4): 417–428.
Published: 01 October 1927
... the abstracts will be more elaborate than those in this volume. \y. K. B. Jean Paul Marat: a Study in Radicalism. By Louis R. Gottschalk. New York: Greenberg, Publisher. 1927. Pp. xv, 221. Marat s is a baffling personality. At least so thought Carlyle, who queries: Did nature, O poor Marat, as in cruel sport...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1952) 51 (1): 151–153.
Published: 01 January 1952
... and to moderate Girondist vituperation of Paris, while he opposed the indictment of his enemy, Marat. When the Paris mob, incited by Marat, forced the National Con­ vention to expel the leading Girondins, Vergniaud did not flee but awaited trial at home and then in prison and accepted execution at the age...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1927) 26 (3): 266–279.
Published: 01 July 1927
... by reproaching him for his temporising spirit 6 and the Girondists by painting him a hypocrite, a corrupter of re­ publican purity, and a self-seeking politician.7 There were still others like May 20, 1793, when the Girondist organ expatiated on his perfidy and cowardice8 and again on July 14, 1793, when Marat...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1952) 51 (1): 148–151.
Published: 01 January 1952
... and to moderate Girondist vituperation of Paris, while he opposed the indictment of his enemy, Marat. When the Paris mob, incited by Marat, forced the National Con­ vention to expel the leading Girondins, Vergniaud did not flee but awaited trial at home and then in prison and accepted execution at the age...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1955) 54 (2): 194–206.
Published: 01 April 1955
... and Marat were forced to leave the country. Mirabeau abandoned the Orleanist faction in disgust and began to make advances to Lafayette and the Court. The Assembly, supported by Lafayette and the National Guard and by Bailly and the municipality of Paris, was at last free to devote itself...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1956) 55 (2): 179–191.
Published: 01 April 1956
.... As usual, Leigh Hunt and his Examiner were more than ready to help out. On the seventh the paper printed as fillers two passages (on Marat and Sansculottism) from Carlyle s French Revolution. It used also a mock-legal Parliamentary petition drawn up by Carlyle as the central argument of a long disquisition...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1997) 96 (4): 949–951.
Published: 01 October 1997
... Kunsum? (coauthored with Maren Domer) appeared in Neue Frauen zwischen den Zeiten, edited by Katja Kobliltz and Petra Bock (1995). peter weiss (1916-1982), playwright, poet, novelist, artist, and filmmaker, is best known for his 1964 play Marat/Sade, which won Lessing-Preis, Antoinette Perry, and Drama...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1952) 51 (1): 146–148.
Published: 01 January 1952
... sources, while the section on the working out of the Soviet nationality policy is based almost entirely on Soviet docu­ ments and accounts. It is not surprising that Lenin looms large in these pages. Robe­ spierre, Marat, and Danton rolled into one, he was the personification of the Russian revolution...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1918) 17 (3): 185–189.
Published: 01 July 1918
... the period covering the Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars there ap­ peared no fiction at all comparable to that of Balzac and Flaubert; no poetry in a category with that of Hugo, Musset, or Lamartine. Incendiary political pamphlets by Mirabeau, Marat, and other Revolutionists were the literary order...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1935) 34 (3): 237–243.
Published: 01 July 1935
..., and freethinkers in re­ ligious matters. They were the Bolsheviks of 1792, and their leaders were Danton, Robespierre, and Marat, who was the Leftward Ho! 239 authentic father of yellow journalism with his vitriolic Ami du Peuple. The Jacobins were nicknamed men of the mountains since the assembly halls were...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1929) 28 (4): 434–448.
Published: 01 October 1929
..., there begin to emerge from the jumble, albeit but dimly at first, the personalities of Robespierre, Danton, Marat, Desmoulins, and others. It is soon evident that Danton is going to be the rough-hewn hero of the play and Robespierre the villain. And so it turns out to be. The real human interest stuff...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1951) 50 (3): 369–377.
Published: 01 July 1951
..., but there are not many other famous names, except for that of Jean Paul Marat, who re­ ceived a mail-order medical degree long before the Deluge. Per­ haps this is too sleepy a town to produce men of mark. Besides, this Scottish university never really endeavored or expected to school many brilliant young men...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1967) 66 (4): 544–553.
Published: 01 October 1967
... in literature to convey truth, as in Faulkner s The Sound and the Fury or the recent hit play, Marat-Sade, and, it may be, in the language of current underground cultures, such as that of drug addiction or crime. If meaningful communication has less and less chance of con­ veying impressions in the usual...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1929) 28 (1): 90–111.
Published: 01 January 1929
... for our delectation eight individual portraits, those of Mirabeau, Danton, Robespierre, Saint-Just, Marat, Camille Desmouline, Vergniaud, and the King, and four other canvases labeled the women , soldiers and generals , leaders of the mob , and secondary figures . The historian, though he be something...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1991) 90 (2): 409–444.
Published: 01 April 1991
... the selection of citations already presupposes a purposiveness, and it is necessary to go through many pages in order to perceive its nonpurposiveness. But here, at random, is Marsovich s description of a suicide: When it grows dark, the bath is filled for Marat, for a brother, for an in-law. When you array...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2020) 119 (3): 521–533.
Published: 01 July 2020
... them Maximilien Robespierre, Jean-Paul Marat, and Georges Danton. For the anniversary of the revolution Nikolai Evreinov organized a massive staging of the storming of the Winter Palace, which Sergei Eisenstein repeated in 1927 for his ‘lm October. Finally, that same year the Bolsheviks executed...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1903) 2 (4): 369–385.
Published: 01 October 1903
... of the nation that he be made a good and serviceable citizen, and unto this end the government should be administered. Danton and Marat tried to build a republic on party tyranny and declared, We must strike terror into the hearts of our foes. It is our only safety. Such a republic could not even come...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1936) 35 (3): 298–318.
Published: 01 July 1936
... fore the end of the regime. Others, like Gaudin, the priceless Minister of Finance, or Marat, Secretary of State, served him to the last. As heads of their respective departments, they were responsible to Napoleon alone, and to no assembly. They formed no council of ministers or cabinet and acted...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1952) 51 (1): 7–32.
Published: 01 January 1952
.... In 1923 there appeared an excellent sketch of Ernest Lavisse French Historian and Educator by Othon Guerlac, of Cornell. Two French revolutionary figures were represented in Louis Gottschalk s Criminality of Jean Paul Marat (April, 1929) and Leo Gershoy s Barere (July, 1927). Thomas Cooper...