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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1986) 85 (4): 394–395.
Published: 01 October 1986
...Everett Emerson One Hundred Years of “Huckleberry Finn”: The Boy, His Book, and American Culture . Edited by Sattelmeyer Robert Crowley J. Donald . Columbia : University of Missouri Press , 1985 . Pp. xx , 428 . $29.00 . Copyright © 1986 by Duke University Press 1986 394...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1952) 51 (1): 120–129.
Published: 01 January 1952
... Letter, by then respectable, nor NLoby Dick, as yet obscure, but a popular two-shilling novel by Mark Twain, with an ugly picture on the cover, a boy s book Huckleberry Finn. This estimate, if intended originally to raise some critical eyebrows, has since been enthusiastically seconded by a host...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1967) 66 (3): 473–474.
Published: 01 July 1967
..., 1966. Pp. viii, 321. $7.50. Perhaps we should not take issue with the critics and biog­ raphers who find the man who wrote Huckleberry Finn and the man who owned the company which published it Mark Twain and Samuel L. Clemens so at odds with each other, of such unlike minds, as to demand that we treat...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1967) 66 (4): 621–622.
Published: 01 October 1967
... on The Blithedale Romance ( From my point of view, Hawthorne s greatest achievement Huckleberry Finn, The Ambassadors, The House of Mirth, Sister Carrie, and, for their instructive parallels or con­ trasts, Jane Austen s Emma and D. H. Lawrence s St. Mawr. The method, especially of two initial groundbreaking...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1962) 61 (3): 326–338.
Published: 01 July 1962
..., and, as we might expect, Mark Twain s books were a pervasive influence on the young Mencken. Huckleberry Finn put into vividly imaginative terms Mencken s own problems with respect to his family and his class; it had a special and enlightening impact. Mencken was rigidly Victorian in his own behavior toward...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1953) 52 (2): 309–310.
Published: 01 April 1953
... of its hero; most of the remainder has to do with his milieu in Hannibal. No startling new disclosures turn up. Probably the most valuable portion is the care­ ful attempt to reconstruct the actual events which were ultimately shaped into various scenes and episodes of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1984) 83 (4): 434–446.
Published: 01 October 1984
.... In the thirty-first chapter of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck is seen sitting on a raft floating down the Mississippi River wondering what to do about the runaway slave, Jim, the property of the poor widow Watson. Huck Finn was a specimen of southern poor white trash, a river rat. But on the raft...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1963) 62 (1): 145–146.
Published: 01 January 1963
... of Huckleberry Finn is a case in point: since it is never Twain who nods, but we that dream, it turns out that this puzzling final section is in reality an artisti­ cally significant hoax against the imperceptive reader. Well, maybe. Nevertheless, the book is important as the first really systematic attempt...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1963) 62 (1): 144–145.
Published: 01 January 1963
... to pedantic extremes. Mr. Covici tends to over-read every­ thing. His book is full of the sort of strained and ostentatious analysis cultivated in the graduate seminars but hardly suited to public print. The elaborate attempt to justify the last ten chapters of Huckleberry Finn is a case in point: since...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1920) 19 (4): 332–340.
Published: 01 October 1920
.... As international copyright did not exist until 1891, it is rather difficult to get accurate data on the sales of books prior to that year. Nevertheless, I have succeeded in assembling a few significant facts. Mark Twain s biographer, Mr. Albert Bigelow Paine, is authority for the statement that Huckleberry Finn...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1986) 85 (4): 392–394.
Published: 01 October 1986
... in the faculty dining room several octaves. LEXINGTON, KY. THOMAS D. CLARK One Hundred Years of Huckleberry Finn : The Boy, His Book, and American Culture. Edited by Robert Sattelmeyer and J. Donald Crowley. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1985. Pp. xx, 428. $29.00. It is natural that on its one...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1976) 75 (1): 142–143.
Published: 01 January 1976
... that confirmed some painful memories helped enrich Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Pettit is also perceptive on Pudd nhead Wilson, refusing to let the difficulties of shaping an explication add up to overstating its caliber. In the wars over political value he keeps neutral, though he may show his leanings...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1977) 76 (2): 133–146.
Published: 01 April 1977
... in Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, he happened upon a black corpse, disembowelled and sunk in the river by slavehunters. When he was fourteen, a slave who was accused of raping a white woman was lynched on the outskirts of Hannibal, before one of the largest crowds ever assembled for a social function...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1984) 83 (3): 352–353.
Published: 01 July 1984
... troversial ending of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and his discussions of the confidence man in Faulkner s Snopes trilogy and Ralph Ellison s Invisible Man. Perhaps he is least persuasive in his considerations of the hero of Arthur Mervyn and of Holgrave in The House of the Seven Gables. For its intellec­...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1954) 53 (4): 590–591.
Published: 01 October 1954
... precisely in the discussion of these influences, which appears in the Intro­ duction under the heading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, that the chief merit of the book lies, and within the area of that discussion it makes its major contribution. fred w. lorch Southern Renascence: The Literature...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1947) 46 (3): 423–424.
Published: 01 July 1947
... the railroad, stories almost as well known as Mark Twain s Huckleberry Finn, are barely mentioned. The sordid and highly involved, but frequently retold, account of the doings of that trio of scala­ wags, Drew, Fiske, and Gould, is briefly disposed of, but Gould is shown to be a man possessing some...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1953) 52 (2): 310–311.
Published: 01 April 1953
... of wit and humor to add as well as a bounteous store of fas­ cinating information about Missouri River towns in the palmy days of steamboats. If one has not read Huckleberry Finn recently, this book will probably instigate a renewed longing to do so, and the new reading will be all the more absorbing...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1976) 75 (1): 141–142.
Published: 01 January 1976
... as eloquence in showing how Clemens ambivalences toward the South the vault of his childhood loves, yet a rude postbellum reality that confirmed some painful memories helped enrich Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Pettit is also perceptive on Pudd nhead Wilson, refusing to let the difficulties of shaping...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1972) 71 (3): 441–442.
Published: 01 July 1972
... a revealing comparison of the outward emblems of Hawthorne s Artist of the Beautiful with the inward symbols of James s Beast in the Jungle and the varied figures of Norris and Crane. He traces the mock epic from Modern Chivalry and the powerful strain of the picaresque re-emerging in Huckleberry Finn...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1972) 71 (3): 442–443.
Published: 01 July 1972
... figures of Norris and Crane. He traces the mock epic from Modern Chivalry and the powerful strain of the picaresque re-emerging in Huckleberry Finn. The tall tale of the South­ west and the new travel writing in Innocents Abroad and Venetian Life, bubble-bursting and reductive, display the features...