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hookworm

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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1911) 10 (2): 142–148.
Published: 01 April 1911
...William H. Glasson The Rockefeller Commission s Campaign Against the Hookworm William H. Glasson, Professor of Economics in Trinity College The organized campaign on American soil for the eradication of hookworm disease began in the island of Porto Rico. At the close of the War with Spain, living...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1912) 11 (2): 128–135.
Published: 01 April 1912
...Jno. A. Ferrell; S. B.; M. D. Copyright © 1912 by Duke University Press 1912 The North Carolina Campaign Against Hookworm Disease Jno. A. Ferrell, S. B., M. D., Ass t Sec y to the N. C. State Board of Health for Hookworm Disease Hookworm disease has been recognized as a serious menace...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1911) 10 (2): 180–183.
Published: 01 April 1911
..., 1910. I desire to publish in connection with the preceding article some detailed information drawn from that report. State directors of sanitation, or assistant secretaries for the hookworm disease, have been appointed in connection with the public health departments of nine southern states. The state...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1913) 12 (2): 190–192.
Published: 01 April 1913
... from the Survey Asso­ ciates, 105 East 22nd Street, New York City. Price $1.50 post­ paid. Dr. John A. Ferrell, who is State Director of the campaign against hookworm disease in North Carolina, reports that dis­ pensaries have thus far been held in 65 counties and that six ad­ ditional counties have...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1915) 14 (1): 98–100.
Published: 01 January 1915
... who reports the discussions. The Houghton Mifflin Company, $1.25 net. The United States Bureau of Education has published a bulletin on The Rural School and Hookworm Disease by Dr. John A. Ferrell. The pamphlet is well illustrated and gives much valuable information regarding the campaign against...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1964) 63 (3): 434–435.
Published: 01 July 1964
... widespread hookworm. A prominent Methodist bishop, the mayor of South Carolina s holy city of Charleston, and many others joined in angry attacks on the defamers of the South who allegedly exag­ gerated the prevalence and significance of hookworm. Mr. Poe re­ torted splendidly: It is high time, anyhow...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1964) 63 (3): 435–436.
Published: 01 July 1964
... of The Progressive Farmer are too numerous to be itemized, but one gains some idea of the obstacles it encountered from the fight against the scandalously widespread hookworm. A prominent Methodist bishop, the mayor of South Carolina s holy city of Charleston, and many others joined in angry attacks...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2016) 115 (4): 763–770.
Published: 01 October 2016
... children, and 23 percent of all deaths can be attributed to modifiable envi- ronmental factors, including WASH (Prüss-Üstün and Corvalán 2006). Such diseases include diarrhea, roundworm, whipworm, hookworm, schis- tosomiasis, and trachoma (see table 1). Feces are implicated in the transmis- sion...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1912) 11 (4): 295–300.
Published: 01 October 1912
... teeth, 25 per cent, en­ larged tonsils, 12 per cent, adenoids, 2 per cent, defective men­ tality, 14 per cent, defective breathing, 23 per cent, defective eye­ sight. In the South in rural communities those having hookworm disease range from 10 per cent, to 75 per cent. Skin diseases, bone deformities...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1909) 8 (3): 201–206.
Published: 01 July 1909
... is being manifested in the ravages of the so-called hookworm disease among large numbers of the poorer people in the rural South. Everybody should read the article in the May number of the World s Work descriptive of the discovery of this human parasite by Dr. Charles Wardell Stiles, and of the evils...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1916) 15 (1): 98–100.
Published: 01 January 1916
..., and in the campaign against hookworm disease. ...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1952) 51 (4): 574–590.
Published: 01 October 1952
... Page and Dr. Charles W. Stiles happened to travel south on the same Pullman to attend a meeting of President Roosevelt s Commission on Country Life. Stiles had learned of hookworm while studying abroad and had observed the presence of the parasite in the Southern States; he called Page s attention...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1919) 18 (2): 97–115.
Published: 01 April 1919
... of rural life and isolation or more likely it is the result of physical causes such as hookworm and malaria. But whatever it is the result of, the one thing that differ­ entiates the mass of Southern men from the mass of Massachusetts men, say, is this lack of intellectual curiosity. Therefore the Southern...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1910) 9 (2): 189–194.
Published: 01 April 1910
..., the South is attractingthe at­ tention of thoughtful men everywhere. In this time of change we are beset on all sides with advice and proffered assistance. We are told that we need to be cured of the hookworm; we need a new kind of education for the masses and a different sort of or­ ganization of our...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1953) 52 (1): 129–133.
Published: 01 January 1953
... scientific farming, to eradicate hookworm and improve public health found allies in social welfare workers who campaigned against child labor and the convict-lease system. But even this chapter ends on a pessimistic note. The philanthropists, estimable gentlemen with high collars and fine principles...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1920) 19 (1): 1–8.
Published: 01 January 1920
... losses. The Rockefeller Foundation, in its work for the eradication of hookworm and malaria, is showing that it is cheaper to prevent disease than it is to have it. Malaria, which greatly reduces the working capacity of the population, is being brought under control by the Rockefeller Foundation...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1922) 21 (4): 327–334.
Published: 01 October 1922
... excuse for a home, as they still rule many a dwelling-place in those inaccessible mountains. The children contracted hookworm and the dreaded disease of the eyes called trachoma, which if unchecked slowly but inevitably leads to total blindness. The twelve-year old twins, Fannie and Annie, had been blind...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1948) 47 (4): 459–468.
Published: 01 October 1948
..., as values more important than the vicarious consumption or vicarious enjoyment by the masses of elite urban living. True, the stomach has suffered, and infant mortality rates have been high, with hookworm and pellagra as more than occasional concomitants of self-sufficiency; but the incidence of nervous...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1940) 39 (4): 427–437.
Published: 01 October 1940
... standards of living; and health con­ ditions have been appalling. Gastrointestinal diseases, malaria, and hookworm are very prevalent, and the death rate from tuberculosis alone is about four and a half times that of the United States. Under Spanish rule, much poverty and misery existed, but they appear...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1933) 32 (3): 283–293.
Published: 01 July 1933
... and poverty. He found that large num­ bers of the tenant class were suffering from hookworm which sapped their energy and left them inert and listless. Soon after his return to New York Page aroused addi­ tional resentment in his home state by the publication of his famous Mummy Letters, in which he exposed...