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dombey

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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1972) 71 (1): 75–90.
Published: 01 January 1972
... the daughter, like Cordelia, tried to remind her parent of herself and the vital quali­ ties she possessed. This became the point in Dombey and Son and Hard Times. Both novels deal with changes Dickens saw taking place in the national character. These changes are caused by Dombeyism and Utilitarianism, while...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2009) 108 (1): 87–114.
Published: 01 January 2009
... and symbol of Victorian virtue, but also as an integral component of a discursive ensemble integrating reader, furnishings, and architecture. In novels like Dombey and Son , Dickens considers the vexing problem of domestic disquiet—the noisy and volatile insecurity of the middle classes at home—while...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1962) 61 (4): 492–505.
Published: 01 October 1962
...Harry Stone Copyright © 1962 by Duke University Press 1962 Dickens Artistry And The Haunted Man Harry Stone If one reads Dickens novels chronologically, one is astonished upon beginning Dombey and Son (1847-48). The first half of Dombey is almost perfect in conception and execution; each...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1962) 61 (3): 405–410.
Published: 01 July 1962
... reporter s zest for meeting people Dickens infused into his novels. And everyone who has been delighted by his first experience of Sam Weller, Edith Dombey, Miss Havisham, or any of the others has felt this zest. It has a number of peculiar effects in Dickens novels. The fascination for meeting people...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1974) 73 (4): 569–570.
Published: 01 October 1974
... to A Christmas Carol and The Chimes, Dombey and Son, Bleak House, Hard Times, and A Tale of Two Cities. The final 5J0 The South Atlantic Quarterly three chapters Politics, Style, The Grotesque range over each writer s works. In places Goldberg adds nicely to previous research, e.g., his chapter...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1974) 73 (4): 568–569.
Published: 01 October 1974
... the temper of the times in which the two men came to maturity. Five chapters on the impact of Carlyle on Dickens works follow, with close attention paid to A Christmas Carol and The Chimes, Dombey and Son, Bleak House, Hard Times, and A Tale of Two Cities. The final ...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1984) 83 (3): 312–322.
Published: 01 July 1984
... (in his preface to Dombey and Son), shows how things would turn out; Dickens showed how things may turn out for the best: His view of art involved compliance with ideals of ordinary folk An instinctive sympathy with the moral prejudices of the everyday man guided Dickens throughout his career. . . [He...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1954) 53 (1): 147–150.
Published: 01 January 1954
... Drood, was a detailed and philosophic social criticism which achieved distinctive form in Dombey and Son and was brought to a culmination in Hard Times. He declares that Dickens understood capitalist industrialism at least as well as most nineteenth-century economists. Now it is true that Dickens...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1921) 20 (1): 41–51.
Published: 01 January 1921
... because he, great critic, once wrote a rather bad novel, Volupte. How­ ell says somewhere that every man, out of the materials of his life, is capable of writing at least one book. Mr. H. G. Wells, in his preface to The Gay-Dombeys, Sir Harry Johns­ 1 Causeries du Lundi 2, M. de Balzac. 42 The South...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1920) 19 (1): 81–96.
Published: 01 January 1920
... might imagine himself back in a Dickens novel. All the weepiness of Dickens at his worst is suggested by the tears of Macready and Jeffrey (quantum mutatus from the tartarly Quarterly days!) over Little Nell, and the broken­ hearted sobs of Macaulay over the first number of Dombey. The honest...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1976) 75 (1): 36–54.
Published: 01 January 1976
... returned (LJ, 311). The train and the infamous level crossing seem to have as much right to be there as the Roman roads which still cut into the chalk of the Downs. The days recorded in Dickens s Dombey and Son, when the permanent way scarred the countryside and the locomotives prowled the night like...