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criollo

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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2016) 115 (3): 615–624.
Published: 01 July 2016
... and colonization led by the overseas metropolis and then later by the administration of the Criollo -elite constructed state. Therefore, this process can also be described as criollization . The transition to colonial-modernity—the current rapid expansion of the state-business-media-Christianity front—intrudes...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1952) 51 (4): 493–503.
Published: 01 October 1952
... ponents. At the top of the system stand the criollos or so-called whites ; the second position is occupied by the mestizos or cholos-, and the lowest position in the social hierarchy is held by the Indians. For the popular mind, these designations criollo, white ; mestizo, cholo-, and Indian bear...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2011) 110 (2): 363–383.
Published: 01 April 2011
..., that the animals will return, so that the children of my children will have forest in those territories. —Drigelio Criollo Queta, RIP, eldest Kofan shaman of Santa Rosa del Guamuéz, interview with author, Shamans’ Videohistory Project, October 2005 Sometime in early 2008, troops of the Colombian...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2007) 106 (1): 107–127.
Published: 01 January 2007
... are?” In Lezama’s American version, the imago, or America, is the image that the colonizers wove together out of a dissident, dispersed, unknown reality, terra incognita, in order to make the fabric of history. But as the American— from the perspective of the imago, and the criollo, in particular—occupies...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1997) 96 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 1997
... of criollos who dreamed, then as now, of Cuba s annexation in one form or another to the United States. Certainly, the first half of the twentieth century (not to mention, the second) in Cuba would be completely incomprehensible if we did not bear in mind, on the one hand, the profound conviction of many...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2024) 123 (2): 255–272.
Published: 01 April 2024
... of transition in which the material and structural conditions that shaped the dictatorial regimes are not modified but maintained?” Very good, it turns out. Fascismo criollo or fascismo militar could appear in this light as a transitional and auxiliary form functional to destroying and disorganizing any...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1923) 22 (2): 115–125.
Published: 01 April 1923
... stories that are clearly differentiated by their Americanism from those of Spain. In some of the countries just mentioned native fiction has been supported by a native drama, the teatro criollo, that has made Literary Americanism in Spanish-America 121 remarkable progress toward independence from foreign...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2012) 111 (1): 81–93.
Published: 01 January 2012
... Nuestra América—Movimiento 13 de Abril (Our America Project—13th of April MovementEd. 7 Criollo is a term frequently used in Latin America to refer to traditional Spanish-­ descended elites. Thus, descriollizar would be to displace or eliminate those elites from...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2014) 113 (4): 791–806.
Published: 01 October 2014
...- lions by the elite criollo leadership. Boves armed slaves against their masters, and his army swelled to more than ten thousand, of which only 1 percent were white. As López Sánchez (2009: 12) describes it, The popular struggle headed by Boves . . . was more a class struggle than...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1997) 96 (1): 65–82.
Published: 01 January 1997
.... Cespedes) was sustained by a pseudoscientific positivism and, therefore, by the rheto­ ric of certain sectors of the criollo bourgeoisie. (In Mexico, for example, 78 Emilio Bejel this was the period of the Porfirio Diaz government.) Positivism, with extreme and persistent pseudoscientificity, attempted...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2007) 106 (1): 61–83.
Published: 01 January 2007
...). The controlled and “elite” poem, rationally representing an unrepresentable awe, colonizes its object in doing so. Higgins, in other words, recasts the conflict between the sublime and beautiful politically, as a war of subjects: “the struggles between criollo elites and the heterogeneous populaces over...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2008) 107 (4): 809–831.
Published: 01 October 2008
... nineteenth century, peninsulares and criollos were paradoxically both anti-imperialist in their nationalist rally cries and disdainful of the very indigenous popu- lations they recruited to their independence movements. And certainly, the post–World War II period was a time of intense violence...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2001) 100 (1): 259–285.
Published: 01 January 2001
..., between the servitude of the coolie and the discrimination toward the criollo, between commercial mo- nopoly and piracy, between the runaway slave settlement and the gov- ernor’s palace; all Europe pulling...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2006) 105 (4): 801–829.
Published: 01 October 2006
... to themselves as criollos (native-born) and to Indians as naturales (pri- mordial natives), they combine what James Clifford calls ‘‘diaspora cos- mopolitanisms which draw on historical contexts of displacement, with indigenous claims to continuity, which rest on ‘‘natural’’ connections to 24 places...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2012) 111 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 January 2012
... and criollo elite discussed by Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui and Roland Denis in this issue. Such lines would become increasingly difficult to sus- tain after the newfound protagonism of these previously marginal sectors. In this sense, it is important to highlight that, intentionally or not, the past two...