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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1957) 56 (1): 146.
Published: 01 January 1957
...Jay Luvaas The Lost Account of the Battle of Corinth and Court-Martial of Gen. van Dorn . By an Unknown Author. Introduction and Informal Essay on the Battle by Cockrell Monroe F. . Jackson, Tennessee : McCowat-Mercer Press , 1955 . Pp. 78 . $1.50 . Copyright © 1957 by Duke...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1957) 56 (1): 146.
Published: 01 January 1957
... Account of the BATTLE OF CORINTH and CourtMartial of GEN. VAN DORN. By an Unknown Author. In­ troduction and Informal Essay on the Battle by Monroe F. Cockrell. Jackson, Tennessee: McCowat-Mercer Press, 1955. Pp. 78. $1.50. In pursuit of his study of the battle of Corinth, Mr. Cockrell located...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1953) 52 (3): 361–383.
Published: 01 July 1953
... inscribed Libeller of the Press and then expelled from camp. Halleck evicted corre­ spondents en masse at Corinth, and Sherman court-martialed those who accompanied his Yazoo expedition against his orders. When Sherman used as his authority for court-martial an army general order which forbade...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1975) 74 (4): 488–494.
Published: 01 October 1975
..., the household clung to the required rituals. Jakob became a Berliner in 1896. In the German capital he at­ tended the gymnasium, and thereafter the school of Applied Arts. In this metropolis, he became a disciple, first of the famous painter, Lovis Corinth, and then of the printmaker, Hermann Struck (who...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1962) 61 (4): 567–572.
Published: 01 October 1962
... Western world. Apparently the volume filled a need, for it now appears in a revised and retitled paperback edition, Intellectual Origins of American Na­ tional Thought (New York: Corinth Books, 1961, $1.95). Selections include not only the classical inheritance but also British and con­ tinental political...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1935) 34 (4): 402–409.
Published: 01 October 1935
..., the Lacedaemonians began to let theirs grow in the joy of success. Nor did they first give into this custom when the Bachiadae fled from Corinth to Lacedaemon and made a dis­ agreeable appearance with their shorn locks. But it is derived from the institution of Lycurgus, who is reported to have said that long hair...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1989) 88 (3): 569–603.
Published: 01 July 1989
..., against opposition itself. Even the first reviewers of Byron s oriental romances The Giaour, The Bride of Abydos, The Corsair, Lara, Parisina, and The Siege of Corinth were confident that the poems formed a series, however obscurely linked. This knowledge did not make its knowers happy. Safely exotic...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1947) 46 (1): 84–92.
Published: 01 January 1947
... depends upon the answer to a compelling question: How could an anima naturaliter Christiana seek to become, as Plutarch did be­ come, priest of the pagan religion of Delphi? St. Paul had com­ pleted his missionary journeys when Plutarch was an infant, and from Corinth to Macedonia Greece was Christianized...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1978) 77 (2): 242–250.
Published: 01 April 1978
... not permanently impair the natural buoyancy of his character. The years chronicled in these volumes were a time of enormous and varied creativity. Even before Byron left England he was writing furiously: ten days in January 1814 sufficed for The Corsair. Lara, Hebrew Melodies, The Siege of Corinth, and Parisina...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2022) 121 (4): 755–775.
Published: 01 October 2022
... of the slaves, one of whom is a messenger sent from Corinth and the other a shepherd from Cithaeron, a former servant of the court of Thebes. The enigma of Laius s murder signals the slippage (décalage) in memory between Jocasta and Oedipus, and this last hitch is eliminated by the harmony between the last two...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1926) 25 (4): 370–382.
Published: 01 October 1926
... not completely find himself, did at least give the first presentation of the formula which was to be his recipe to the end of his variegated career. The plot is the old cliche, first introduced to modern litera­ ture by Goethe in the Bride of Corinth. Daphne, betrothed to a pagan lover but consecrated to Christ...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1945) 44 (1): 69–81.
Published: 01 January 1945
... relief; estab­ lishment of a sanitarium in Albuquerque, New Mexico; erection of an agricultural college in Corinth, Greece; provision of scholar­ ship funds for worthy students of Greek descent; and the mainte­ nance of benefit funds for its members. Less is known about the G. A. P. A., but its social...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1931) 30 (4): 405–419.
Published: 01 October 1931
... of Corinth, and its colonies, especially Syracuse and Croton Plutarch relates the familiar tale of the purchase of Bu­ cephalas. When his early owner, Philonicus of Thessaly, offered him to Philip of Macedon for thirteen talents (be­ tween $15,000 and $16,000), the offer was declined, since the horse...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1943) 42 (4): 356–369.
Published: 01 October 1943
... Corinth, Jerusa­ Sinews of Empire, 1943 357 lem, and Cyrene, among other localities, remained in general and in particular, antithetical. Churchill knows all this, as do the scholars of the great modern Empire on which the sun never sets, with its quarter-global area and population of, on the whole...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1935) 34 (4): 444–459.
Published: 01 October 1935
... passes through; some lovely, some terrible, all with the touch that shows how humanity appealed to this genius. The tale of the siege of Lepanto Corinth suggests the history of Roger of Sicily and his campaign of four hundred years earlier. Of the voyage of the Sol and the capture by corsairs, the life...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2010) 109 (4): 677–693.
Published: 01 October 2010
... for “secular” critique? The apostle Paul admonished the (very charismatic) believers in Corinth, counseling that “the prophets are subject to the prophets” (1 Cor. 14:32, NRSV). One might suggest that the prophetic critical tradition can drink from its own wells—that what global Pentecostalism...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2022) 121 (4): 777–794.
Published: 01 October 2022
... the Phoebus [Apollo] half, the Tiresias half; and then a human half, the individual alethurgy of memory and inquiry, with a murder half, one part of which is held by Jocasta and another by Oedipus; and then a birth half, the birth of Oedipus, one part of which comes from Corinth, brought by the messenger...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1997) 96 (3): 599–620.
Published: 01 July 1997
... as choices between destinies (the crossroads), and the pull of more than one attractor (Thebes or Corinth? Shades of the strawbrained Scarecrow at the crossroads giving befuddled directions to Oz). Indeed, I think Deleuze and Guattari form a triangular assemblage with Freud from which a theory emerges...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2010) 109 (4): 653–676.
Published: 01 October 2010
... powers” and goes on to argue that the rulers are owed obedience because they are appointed by God as God’s ministers [diakonoi, leitourgoi].27 Taubes links this passage to 1 Corinthians 7:29–31, where Paul urges the Christians of Corinth to live “as if not” because “the schema of this world...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2010) 109 (4): 765–790.
Published: 01 October 2010
... competition with the Roman government. Of all forms of sedition and treason, Luke says, Christianity is innocent. Paul engenders consider- able upheaval as a part of his mission, but time and again—in Corinth, Jerusalem, Caesarea, and Rome (so the reader understands...