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buffon

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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1948) 47 (2): 253–256.
Published: 01 April 1948
... of a pseudoscientific thesis respecting America which goes back to Buffon in the middle of the eighteenth century. Buffon began with the thesis of the inferiority of the species of American animals. He assumed that size was an attribute of perfection and com­ pared the cowardly puma of America to the brave lion...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1948) 47 (2): 252–253.
Published: 01 April 1948
... of a pseudoscientific thesis respecting America which goes back to Buffon in the middle of the eighteenth century. Buffon began with the thesis of the inferiority of the species of American animals. He assumed that size was an attribute of perfection and com­ pared the cowardly puma of America to the brave lion...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1941) 40 (3): 259–268.
Published: 01 July 1941
... of attack the accepted dogma that the style is the man For the famous aphorism of Buffon which has become the epitome of modern theory of style Ces choses sont hors de l homme, le style est l homme meme should be taken as the starting point rather than as the destination of any search into the meaning...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1953) 52 (4): 619–620.
Published: 01 October 1953
... formulation to a scientific naturalism culminating in the doctrines of Diderot, La Mettrie, Buffon, and D Holbach. His practice, however, is better than his profession. He does not beg the question whether Des­ cartes s philosophy was the chief influence in this development. Although there is no specific...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1953) 52 (4): 617–619.
Published: 01 October 1953
... of Diderot, La Mettrie, Buffon, and D Holbach. His practice, however, is better than his profession. He does not beg the question whether Des­ cartes s philosophy was the chief influence in this development. Although there is no specific section dealing with the relation between the ideologies...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1914) 13 (2): 189–193.
Published: 01 April 1914
...Gilbert Cosulich Copyright © 1914 by Duke University Press 1914 The Poetical Technique of Coleridge Gilbert Cosulich West DesMoines High School, Iowa. Although Buffon has said that the style is the man himself, it shall be our endeavor to confine the present general study to manner rather...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1959) 58 (3): 421–426.
Published: 01 July 1959
... of it was new. The traditional picture of creation as an act of God, which took place at an agreed date, 4004 B.C., once for all, had been challenged ever since Ray in the seventeenth century had ques­ tioned the novity of the earth. Buffon had been condemned by the Church authorities over it a century later...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1941) 40 (1): 37–45.
Published: 01 January 1941
... championing Buffon and Lamarck, resurrected Erasmus Darwin. Until his death he shook the in­ heritance of acquired characters and the skeleton of Erasmus Darwin in the faces of Charles Darwin and his apostles. In Life and Habit he developed the theory of Unconscious Memory as an explanation for the growth...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1959) 58 (2): 196–205.
Published: 01 April 1959
... plunders and exploits that science in order to establish his points of reference. His method is quasi-scientific; he seeks an impersonal authentication. Murry s approach and thought in The Problem of Style is per­ sonal. Style, he would have said, is personality; or, with Buffon, Le style, c est l homme...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1973) 72 (2): 270–279.
Published: 01 April 1973
... structured into a unified whole several historical, philosophic, and scientific ideas derived from the works of such men as Erasmus Darwin, Vico, Voltaire, Gibbon, Kant, Lamarck, Buffon, Sir Charles Lyell, Joseph Hooker, Robert Cham­ bers, and Asa Gray, (ii) The Origin reflects a convention of many epics...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1937) 36 (1): 108–120.
Published: 01 January 1937
... not avoid the larger dra­ matic ironies in the relations between Reaumur and Buffon, Lamarck and Cuvier, Wilson and Audubon, Huxley and Bishop Wilberforce, Fabre and Pasteur. He discerns the possibility of the epic in the commonplace. Yet he composes little prose lyrics on seeds, warblers, the weevily...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1972) 71 (1): 91–105.
Published: 01 January 1972
... Jefferson used to rebuff the ideas of Buffon and Raynal when he was in France: Men, admired as profound philosophers, have, in direct terms, attributed to her inhabitants a physical superiority and have gravely asserted that all animals, and with them the human species, degenerate in America that even dogs...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2007) 106 (3): 599–613.
Published: 01 July 2007
...—Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon, can argue the 608  Bethany Schneider generic degeneracy of the New World by accusing Indian men of being passionless toward women and small-penised. Jefferson defends “his” Indi- ans’ masculinity, arguing that they are as passionate toward women...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2006) 105 (2): 303–319.
Published: 01 April 2006
..., in a game we won 2–1 at Anfield, was stel- lar. He took a lofted pass from the young Frenchman Anthony Le Tallec and curled and dipped it with searing power and accuracy over the head of the Juve keeper, Gianluigi Buffon. The return match in Turin witnessed the transformation of Jamie Carragher, the other...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1998) 97 (3-4): 623–642.
Published: 01 July 1998
... to hereditary power and to widen the individual s sphere of independence, included Lord Shaftesbury, Bernard de Mandeville, William Temple, Montesquieu, John Bolingbroke, Voltaire, Buffon, David Hume, Mably, Henry Linguet, A. Ferguson, Adam Smith. Most of them, inspired by biological and re­ lated science...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2002) 101 (4): 927–954.
Published: 01 October 2002
... was taken literally by European intellectuals like Buffon, de Paw, and l’Abee Reynal to mean, first, ‘‘newness’’ literally and, second, to be associated with ‘‘youth ‘‘immaturity’’ ‘‘weakness contrary to the Old World that was ‘‘mature’’ both physically and ‘‘mentally Within this tradition it is not sur...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1993) 92 (2): 209–260.
Published: 01 April 1993
... Renaissance: Literacy, Terri­ toriality, and Colonization (Ann Arbor). 2 Semantic constructions acquire, through time, an ontological dimension. New World was not an exception and, by the eighteenth century, the metaphor be­ came reality and the natural world was described, from Buffon to Hegel, passing...