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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1987) 86 (3): 349–350.
Published: 01 July 1987
...James M. Diehl Under the Bombs: The German Home Front 1942–1945 . By Beck Earl R. . Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky , 1986 . Pp. x , 252 . Copyright © 1987 by Duke University Press 1987 Book Reviews 349 eral of Kentucky and member of Congress, added further...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2013) 112 (1): 99–114.
Published: 01 January 2013
.... Matthew Abraham The Fanonian Specter in Palestine: Suicide Bombing and the Final Colonial War If, in fact, my life is worth as much as the colonist’s, his look can no longer strike fear into me or nail me to the spot and his...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2008) 107 (2): 321–337.
Published: 01 April 2008
...James Mandrell Although separated by thirty months, the al-Qaeda attacks in Madrid and in New York offer a unique opportunity to compare the rhetorical and practical reactions to the bombings on March 11, 2004, and destruction of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, revealing...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1950) 49 (2): 150–158.
Published: 01 April 1950
...Stanton A. Coblentz Copyright © 1950 by Duke University Press 1950 CAN MANKIND SURVIVE? STANTON A. COBLENTZ SINCE THAT DAY in 1945 when the atomic bomb wrecked the city of Hiroshima, atomic fission has worked an explosive change in world opinion; even restrained and conservative thinkers have...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2008) 107 (2): 213–229.
Published: 01 April 2008
... in the fall of 2001 seemed to be an affront to the supposed overwhelming superiority of American military might. How dare these ragged fighters escape our gaze and the explosive power of our bombs and shells by going underground! Never mind the fact that bunker-busting technology would have had little...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2002) 101 (2): 385–389.
Published: 01 April 2002
...- tions. When we hear how the bombings were a totally unexpected shock, how the unimaginable Impossible happened, one should recall the other de- fining catastrophe from the beginning of the twentieth century...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1964) 63 (2): 188–197.
Published: 01 April 1964
... Lecturer in American Literature and Civilization at the University of Saigon. He writes that about a week after the bombing described herein, his house and those of the two other American professors were searched at 2:00 A.M., quite thoroughly, without a warrant, by what seemed to be agents of three...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1994) 93 (2): 265–278.
Published: 01 April 1994
... is echoed in the narrative by the characters transforming themselves into actors. As the novel progresses, Billy Pilgrim slowly changes into costume until, just before the bombing, he is clad in a blue toga and silver slippers. The residents of Dresden who get their first look at American soldiers...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1947) 46 (1): 27–43.
Published: 01 January 1947
..., it was certain that Dresden would not be bombed. After Stalingrad, however, people began also to listen to the pessimists, though they remained as a whole unshaken in their hopeful attitude. Incidentally, this optimism in regard to Dresden was shared throughout Germany; the capital of Saxony was called...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1975) 74 (4): 404–417.
Published: 01 October 1975
.... In point of fact, there are few abroad who advocate strategies of terror. One man s terror is another s patriotism. Consequently, there is extensive concern with the new terrorists but no generally ac­ cepted definition of terrorism: carpet bombing of Hanoi is thus a legitimate exercise of war, the seizure...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2005) 104 (2): 217–225.
Published: 01 April 2005
... by a clear division between inter-European war and colonial war, to increasing confusion as the methods and technology of colonial police actions were imported into the European theater. Aerial bombing (itself a continuation of the colonial practice of gunboat diplo- macy, shelling port cities from...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1987) 86 (3): 347–349.
Published: 01 July 1987
... of their human strands. He has acutely perceived both the dynamics and human nuances which give the Breckinridges a firm claim on a niche in American history. LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY THOMAS D. CLARK Under the Bombs: The German Home Front 1942-1945. By Earl R. Beck. Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky, 1986...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1993) 92 (4): 817–825.
Published: 01 October 1993
.... A very dumb bomb, rigged on a winch, slammed repeatedly at a target painted on the floor, deci­ mating hapless machines that strayed into the area. Ten-foot-square computer-retouched photos of naked soldiers in homoerotic poses adorned some machines and the walls of the site. A mobile overhead crane...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1946) 45 (3): 265–285.
Published: 01 July 1946
... understanding. Without a common terminology, world government would go to pieces before it started; let us hope that such a retrograde process has not already begun. The world-government solution proposes as a remedy for the Atomic Age the one thing which is to each basic creed worse than atomic bombing...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1994) 93 (2): 361–372.
Published: 01 April 1994
... from 1945 on is based on events of the nine months of his life from June 1944 to March 1945. The Allied landing in Normandy, which came shortly after massive bombing raids had established the Allies mastery of the skies in early June, convinced Celine that it was high time for him to flee Paris. Once...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1963) 62 (4): 539–550.
Published: 01 October 1963
... of the Garden, fallen away from the golden age. What Styron calls the miseries of our century 8 result from that knowl­ edge of the mechanicall arts, which is equated with civilized technology, urban areas like New York, the atom bomb and other instruments of war, and American materialism. We must endure...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1973) 72 (1): 22–28.
Published: 01 January 1973
... the tre­ mendous success it is. In 1939, angered by the shortsightedness of air-raid planning for the coming war, he wrote a very accurate description of the impact of bombing on the civilian population of England. The book was a great popular hit but somehow missed pointing out that dropping bombs...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2011) 110 (3): 757–769.
Published: 01 July 2011
... of environmental ter- ror. It saw the first use of poison gas on the battlefield and the beginnings of the aerial bombardment of cities. The possibility of strategic bombing revealed society as having new spatial, logistical, and ecological dimen- sions. Enemy society was discovered...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (1949) 48 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 January 1949
... catastrophe of bloody revolution unless he could somehow save the country, though the actual number of the revolutionaries and their passive sympathizers in terms of the total population was so tiny that his fears seem almost pathological. Palmer s Red phobia was probably accentuated by a series of bomb...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2002) 101 (2): 253–265.
Published: 01 April 2002
...- asters? I would say that we were defeated to the extent that we became like the enemy we opposed. Early in the war we condemned the Germans for their indiscriminate bombing of civilians. By or we were engaging in the most...