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black and Asian British artists

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Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2016) 115 (4): 665–683.
Published: 01 October 2016
... the development of British cultural studies as an anti-elitist, theoretically informed approach to the field of culture, in particular popular culture. Second, I propose that as this space also opened itself up, starting in the late 1980s, to emerging young black and Asian British artists, and as it extended...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2011) 110 (4): 867–883.
Published: 01 October 2011
..., and miners, lived in Peak Hill, a small gold-­mining town in Western Australia. Some of these populations were involved in the impor- tation of South Asian laborers into the state and others in the pearling industry farther north.29 These various black populations (some Aborigi- nes among...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2001) 100 (4): 949–966.
Published: 01 October 2001
..., political figures, writers, and entertainers from all over the world as they ar- rivedinEngland.TheWest Indian Gazette and Afro-Asian Caribbean News, which she edited, carried in all its issues coverage of the African world...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2022) 121 (1): 109–130.
Published: 01 January 2022
... and the violence of westward expansion, but he falls short. Hamid presents future California as a promised land representing futurity for Black and Asian characters without adequately historicizing the deep past of dispossession of Native sovereignty. As a device, Hamid s magic doors become an alibi just like Lee...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2016) 115 (4): 651–664.
Published: 01 October 2016
... a key commitment for Hall—he was consistently supportive of black and Asian “cultural producers”—the term Hall preferred to artists. But Hall’s was never an essentialist underwrit- ing, as McRobbie emphatically points out, dedicated as he was—in McRob- bie’s rendering—to securing a “third space...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2017) 116 (1): 218–222.
Published: 01 January 2017
... 2017 Notes on Contributors Ian Baucom works on twentieth century British literature and culture, post- colonial and cultural studies, and African and Black Atlantic literatures. He is the author of Out of Place: Englishness, Empire and the Locations of Identity (1999), Specters...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2011) 110 (2): 577–581.
Published: 01 April 2011
... of con- temporary Asian American and African American experimental poetry and poetics. His current research focuses on ethnic literary formations and contemporary theories of poetic form. Eric Cheyfitz is the Ernest I. White Professor of American Studies and Humane Letters...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2021) 120 (4): 923–926.
Published: 01 October 2021
... of the journal New Formations. As well as having published widely on cultural theory, music culture, and political philosophy, he writes regularly on UK politics in the British press, and is a host of the #ACFM podcast on Novara Media. Rafael Grohmann is an assistant professor in communication at Unisinos...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2010) 109 (2): 369–389.
Published: 01 April 2010
..., in the development of black British feminism and in opening up a space to think critically not just about the Hallian race/class conjuncture, but the intersectionality of race/class alongside questions of gender and sexuality. Pratibha Parmar and Carby creatively use the experiences of South Asian and black...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2010) 109 (3): 555–576.
Published: 01 July 2010
... for culture in Asian and Afri- can nations formerly under direct or indirect British rule were especially acute in the two decades after 1955.13 A profound and intensive search for new artistic languages began at that time, which would seek to recover expressivity that had been...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2001) 100 (3): 717–728.
Published: 01 July 2001
... 718 Paul Sharrad If I stop to ask myself how, as a white schoolboy, I came into contact with a delegate of the Afro-Asian bloc of the UN in Port Moresby, I would have to say, ‘‘Through the missions My parents...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2010) 109 (3): 451–473.
Published: 01 July 2010
... in the Spanish-​speaking Caribbean, such as Cuba and Puerto Rico, in Latin America (including Mexico and Brazil), in addition to the black British experience, and they include recent African migrations and the new diaspora in Europe. Bringing these important new explorations and perspectives to bear...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2010) 109 (1): 75–94.
Published: 01 January 2010
... was introduced by Egyptians, Syrians, and those in European communities (Greeks, Italians, and British) who had settled there with the colonial state. The inhabitants of Khartoum witnessed the emergence of a new form of popular exhibition during the 1930s, thanks to the efforts of many self-made artists...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2002) 101 (4): 729–755.
Published: 01 October 2002
... Asian or East Asian modernity. For the labor of registering the contingency and plu- rality of modernity critically demands staying with the modalities of power that inhere in such difference, including within non-Western formations of 25 state and nation...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2001) 100 (1): 171–214.
Published: 01 January 2001
... and cultural ‘‘purity’’ played a central role in westernized Africans’ and repatratriated blacks’ literary re- sponses to British colonial racism. The hundreds of Afro-Brazilians who re- peatedly traveled as merchants...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2017) 116 (4): 763–780.
Published: 01 October 2017
... of the anarchist movement, whose activists and ideas widely circulated between Southern and Eastern Europe, Latin America, and differ- ent Asian countries. After Marx’s death, socialism based its hopes and expectations on the growing strength of the industrial working class, mostly white and male...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2001) 100 (3): 627–658.
Published: 01 July 2001
... the global narrative out of the despair we detect in the letter by the boys from Guinea, Asian countries, especially Japan and Korea, became leaders in a new narrative of global capital. And yet, although the African and Asian entry...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2010) 109 (2): 279–312.
Published: 01 April 2010
.... Such acts of individual dismemberment ensure the further attempt to obscure the complexities of all race identification (whether European, African, Asian, Native American, or some hybrid blending). Thus, to con- struct blacks as members of the race is necessarily to mangle historical...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2008) 107 (4): 755–789.
Published: 01 October 2008
... of nationalists, to the extent that it was this class that had benefited most from British economic hegemony. By attacking British imperialism, these intellectuals invited the comparison between Argentina and the colo- nies of the British Empire. Before intellectuals in Africa, the Asian subcon- tinent...
Journal Article
South Atlantic Quarterly (2001) 100 (3): 803–827.
Published: 01 July 2001
...- plain African, Asian, and Latin American literary production, the literature of China and Senegal, has been (inevitably) read as nothing more than a patronizing...