This essay explores the politics of “hovering” in public restrooms, or the practice of refusing to sit on public toilets. How do such practices reveal a fundamental disregard for others? Drawing on transgender and disability studies, I trace the effects of such practices and their connection to concepts of “safety,” “comfort,” “cleanliness,” and “sameness.” How might we instead imagine restrooms as sites of collective belonging?

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