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privacy

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Journal Article
Social Text (1 June 2005) 23 (2 (83)): 95–108.
Published: 01 June 2005
...David J. Phillips Duke University Press 2005 From Privacy to Visibility CONTEXT, IDENTITY, AND POWER IN UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING ENVIRONMENTS...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 December 2005) 23 (3-4 (84-85)): 275–284.
Published: 01 December 2005
...Nayan Shah Duke University Press 2005 Policing Privacy, Migrants, and the Limits of Freedom In June 2003 the U.S. Supreme Court delivered a landmark ruling that Nayan Shah decriminalized consensual sodomy. Lawrence and Garner...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 June 2005) 23 (2 (83)): np.
Published: 01 June 2005
... Biometrics and Post-9/11 Technostalgia Kelly A. Gates 35 Surveillance in Decolonized Social Space: The Case of Sex Workers in Bengal Swati Ghosh 55 Resisting Surveillance John Gilliom 71 Global Citizens and Local Powers: Surveillance in Turkey Çag˘atay Topal 85 From Privacy to...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 June 2005) 23 (2 (83)): 1–19.
Published: 01 June 2005
..., terrorist cells, the Unabomber, genetic mutations, social isolation, political apathy, child pornography, the end of privacy, and so on. The end of privacy has become a particularly powerful myth about freedom’s withering in the...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 June 2005) 23 (2 (83)): 71–83.
Published: 01 June 2005
... surveillance was the venerable right to privacy. Instead, this project sought to assess the life of a surveillance subject that in a way did not presume what the languages, concerns, and responses would be but, rather, set out to explore...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 December 2005) 23 (3-4 (84-85)): 141–155.
Published: 01 December 2005
... remaps and recodes freedom and liberation in terms of privacy, domes- ticity, and consumption.8 In other words, homonormativity anesthetizes queer communities into passively accepting alternative forms of inequality in return for...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 December 2010) 28 (4 (105)): 25–44.
Published: 01 December 2010
..., and how to balance the competing values of free creative expression, students’ right to privacy, and campus security. Many of these directives minimize the first two values and emphasize the last. The University of Illinois, for instance, casts a very wide net for potentially violent...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 June 2017) 35 (2 (131)): 17–38.
Published: 01 June 2017
... homosexuality would remain a “private practice among adults,” and Hayek sought to protect this privacy: “A man’s house is his castle,” he wrote. “Nobody has a right even to take cognizance of his activities within it.” 32 This valorization of privacy has been highlighted in existing studies of the sexual...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 December 2005) 23 (3-4 (84-85)): 235–249.
Published: 01 December 2005
... reasons for concern. First, whether appli- cable to same- or opposite-sex conduct, Lawrence’s holding is neverthe- less ultimately grounded in the principle of privacy. Insofar as we regard sex as an ultimately political and...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 December 2005) 23 (3-4 (84-85)): np.
Published: 01 December 2005
... Lawrence v. Texas? Teemu Ruskola 235 Uncivil Wrongs: Race, Religion, Hate, and Incest in Queer Politics Michael Cobb 251 Policing Privacy, Migrants, and the Limits of Freedom Nayan Shah 275...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 June 2016) 34 (2 (127)): 21–44.
Published: 01 June 2016
...-hearted stand against the NSA (the FBI, the pentagon, the police, etc.) to protect our privacy amounts to only a battle among the many capitals for the ownership rights to this commodity. In passing, it should be clarified that this commodity, privacy, a subset of the domain of our sensibilities that have...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 March 2018) 36 (1 (134)): 45–54.
Published: 01 March 2018
... same kind of scenario along a multitude of vectors: medical privacy, legal documentation status, gender identity, and so forth. 16 To be clear: these are not state actors, who likely have much more powerful tools. This is not the NSA. These are not the Snowden revelations. This is neither PRISM...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 December 2005) 23 (3-4 (84-85)): 251–274.
Published: 01 December 2005
... “different lifestyles,” Santorum explained, the dangerous case is made that “you can do whatever you want to do, as long as it’s in the privacy of your own home.” When he made these remarks, he was concerned about the impending...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 March 2006) 24 (1 (86)): 1–35.
Published: 01 March 2006
Journal Article
Social Text (1 December 2005) 23 (3-4 (84-85)): 1–17.
Published: 01 December 2005
... lesbian liberal platform advocating for gay marriage while rhetorically remapping and recoding freedom and liberation in nar- row terms of privacy, domesticity, and the unfettered ability to consume in the “free” market, collaborates with a mainstreamed nationalist politics...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 December 2005) 23 (3-4 (84-85)): 171–191.
Published: 01 December 2005
... to privacy not collectively experienced by all sexual minorities. The privacy this meta- phor takes for granted requires specific economic, cultural, and familial circumstances. Likewise, the “coming out” metaphor suggests a kind of mobility not universally...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 December 2003) 21 (4 (77)): 139–153.
Published: 01 December 2003
... economy, as community and citizenship versus self-interested individuals, and as the privacy of the “household” versus the larger political and social order.4 I focus on the impact of globalization on lower-income countries— using Argentina as an example—and emphasize three aspects of this...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 March 2005) 23 (1 (82)): 37–42.
Published: 01 March 2005
... hermetic city behind plate glass that seduces, suspending much of narration. LA in the permanent fetish state of the photograph, whispering “look but don’t touch,” demanding privacy, retreat, and emotional disengagement. In LA, when strangers bump into each other on trains, buses, or streets, it...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 June 2005) 23 (2 (83)): 85–93.
Published: 01 June 2005
..., Empire (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), 310. 16. Kevin D. Haggerty and Richard V. Ericson, “The Surveillant Assem- blage,” British Journal of Sociology, no. 4 (2000): 610. 17. Roger Whitaker, The End of Privacy (New York: New Press, 1999). 18. Manuel Castells...
Journal Article
Social Text (1 June 2012) 30 (2 (111)): 99–119.
Published: 01 June 2012