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non-sovereignty

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Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (2 (53)): 193–200.
Published: 01 July 2017
.... Bonilla's Non-Sovereign Futures promised to answer these questions. In the process, it has also profoundly reshaped my thinking on the subject. The book's critical intervention is to establish non-sovereignty as a category of state formation in its own right. Non-sovereignty is not a halfway status...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (2 (53)): 184–192.
Published: 01 July 2017
... moments of discontinuity and rupture. © Small Axe, Inc. 2017 freedom non-sovereignty Yarimar Bonilla marronage Guadeloupe If men wish to be free, it is precisely sovereignty they must renounce. —Hannah Arendt, “What Is Freedom?” Yarimar Bonilla's Non-Sovereign Futures: French...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (2 (53)): 201–208.
Published: 01 July 2017
... similarities between Puerto Rico and places like Guadeloupe, Curaçao, and the Virgin Islands. 7 Further, it represents a commitment to viewing non-sovereignty itself as a larger condition that characterizes the region as a whole. As Fryar notes in her essay, even the residents of societies with “flag...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2019) 23 (2 (2)): 1–16.
Published: 01 July 2019
... with labor activists in Guadeloupe in the early 2000s, “non-sovereignty” is Bonilla’s term for describing “the historical and political imaginaries” that trouble “the conceptual arsenal of political modernity,” chiefly the terms and ideas of freedom and sovereignty. As Bonilla explains, the labor activists...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2022) 26 (2 (68)): 163–175.
Published: 01 July 2022
... as an allegory of abjection and (non)sovereignty in dialogue with the work of the late Puerto Rican feminist deconstructionist Mara Negrón. In doing so, I hope to articulate a response to The Cry of the Senses that amplifies and intensifies two of the many aspects of the book that I found most “vital...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (1 (70)): 131–142.
Published: 01 March 2023
... and alignments.” 2 Bonilla’s and Joseph-Gabriel’s attention to alternative systems of belonging is central to their assertions of “non-sovereignty” and “decolonial citizenship.” Both query Black people’s relationship to the state and their questions about the utility of these systems for their lives...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2022) 26 (2 (68)): 176–193.
Published: 01 July 2022
...,” Mendoza–de Jesús’s reading of “the ontic” in “the ‘lived experience’ of Blackness” and questions of “(non)sovereignty,” and Zambrana’s reading of “evictions” in the long history of Vieques and its trade and Maroon economies with smaller, English colonized islands, as well as the “dispossess[ion...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Small Axe (2020) 24 (1 (61)): 69–77.
Published: 01 March 2020
...: University of North Carolina Press, 2016). 5 Yarimar Bonilla theorizes “non-sovereign” political formations as “immanent critique” of the status of “sovereignty” as a political orientation. See Bonilla, Non-Sovereign Futures , xiv. The intervention I make is close to Bonilla’s, but I am less invested...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2013) 17 (3 (42)): 152–165.
Published: 01 November 2013
... of broader global historical patterns. We must thus pay greater critical attention to the consequences of casting non-independent states, failed states, and nonsovereign enclaves as exceptions to the rule of national sovereignty. Across and beyond the Caribbean region the casting of these exceptions projects...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2020) 24 (2 (62)): 147–162.
Published: 01 July 2020
... , no. 42 (November 2013): 152–65; and Yarimar Bonilla and Max Hantel, “Visualizing Sovereignty: Cartographic Queries for the Digital Age,” archipelagos , no. 1 (June 2016), archipelagosjournal.org/issue01/bonilla-visualizing.html . 5 See Yarimar Bonilla, Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Small Axe (2019) 23 (3 (60)): 167–177.
Published: 01 November 2019
... the question of how a liberal universalism came to accommodate itself to the exclusionary practices of imperial domination. 7 In pursuing this line, theorists have explored the ways characterizations and depictions of non-European societies and peoples shape the justificatory or critical stances liberals...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (2 (53)): 45–61.
Published: 01 July 2017
... collapses the maintenance of racial purity and the survival of social structures, leaving the reader to assume that the social practices of the Taino ended once they took non-Taino partners—perhaps accurately, but also conveniently for the new state, since Madiou describes Taino families as having exercised...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (3 (54)): 124–137.
Published: 01 November 2017
... of the 1960s that allowed Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, and Guyana to catch up with Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and Cuba rendered none of these territories different from putatively “non-sovereign” territories in the region: “The history of the Caribbean demonstrates that sovereignty is a fiction...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 199–205.
Published: 01 November 2016
... in US-centric Latina/o and African diaspora studies in which the US space necessarily leads to eureka moments while the non-US space remains backward, caught in the realm of the ‘not yet.’” 18 In turn, Decena shows how Lara's novel challenges such narratives not by placing the two female protagonists...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2022) 26 (2 (68)): 108–118.
Published: 01 July 2022
... is central to the subjugation of Black people in relation to White and other non-Black people (particularly Indigenous-, South Asian–, Chinese-, and Syrian Lebanese–descended peoples in the region) but also structures violent relations and racialization among Afro-diasporic people. Yet Black has never...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2020) 24 (2 (62)): 67–77.
Published: 01 July 2020
... of sovereignty as a North Atlantic universal, see Yarimar Bonilla, Non-Sovereign Futures: French Carib-bean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015), and “Ordinary Sovereignty,” Small Axe , no. 42 (November 2013): 151–65. 6 See Bertin M. Louis Jr., “Haitian...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 65–79.
Published: 01 November 2016
..., much if not most of the large native populations inhabiting these islands were non-white. Thus, for the first time in its history, the United States acquired sovereignty over non contiguous lands separated by thousands of miles from the political and economic epicenter of the American polity...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2020) 24 (1 (61)): 96–102.
Published: 01 March 2020
..., and environmental contexts in the region. As Dalleo acutely shows, this activism had influenced the political futures and projects of many Caribbean nations, which selected either independence or what Yarimar Bonilla calls “non-sovereign futures.” 18 Given how influential Haiti has been to Pan-Caribbean thought...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2007) 11 (3): 130–138.
Published: 01 October 2007
..., and while I risk displacing the importance of historians, literary and cultural critics and other non-social-scientists, it does appear that the most visible face of Caribbean femin­ism in terms of the leadership of academic units and the production of anthologies, is a social...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2015) 19 (1 (46)): 147–158.
Published: 01 March 2015
... of “erasure/non-visibility” or (I would add) segregated visibility (as in reggae and sports celebrity), which reinscribes the violent fault-line of a racialized practice of power. 5 It is, therefore, conducted through varying ideological props inducing other forms of differences to collide or be elided...