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nardal

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Journal Article
Small Axe (2005) 9 (1): 129–133.
Published: 01 March 2005
... attend to the fi rst question regarding a gender-inclusive genealogy of Négri- tude. Edwards painstakingly demonstrates the erasure of Paulette and Jane Nardal in particular in the vast majority of scholarly discussions of Négritude, owing in no small way to narratives spun by Aimé...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2005) 9 (1): 134–149.
Published: 01 March 2005
... of francophone women intellectuals such as the Nardal sisters and Suzanne Lacascade. I did not cite her as a fellow traveler because, by that point, my own book was in page proofs; it was originally scheduled to appear in March 2003 but was held up until May by a printer’s delay. If I had been...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (1 (70)): 143–153.
Published: 01 March 2023
... women such as Suzanne Césaire, Paulette Nardal, Eugénie Éboué-Tell, Jane Vialle, Andrée Blouin, Aoua Kéita, and Eslanda Robeson were instrumental not only in (re)thinking and (re)defining Black belonging within a larger French polity that included the Caribbean and Africa but also in shaping global...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (1 (70)): 131–142.
Published: 01 March 2023
... are the other conditions by which these women come together and how might we incorporate new archives or read the old ones anew (as Joseph-Gabriel has done with Nardal’s archive, for example) to account for the intellectual trajectories that Joseph-Gabriel encourages us to deliberate and draw inspiration from...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (1): v–ix.
Published: 01 February 2006
... that contributed hugely to a black internationalism centering on Paris in the early decades of the twentieth century, Brent Hayes Edwards sketches among others the biographies of Paulette Nardal and Jane Nardal, two of seven sisters from an educated black Martinican family whose contributions to the founding...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2012) 16 (3 39): 143–165.
Published: 01 November 2012
... of one’s national identification: Guadeloupe? Unpronounceable. Unrepeatable. Bearing in mind Harris-Perry’s warning against the dangers of unrelated “fictive kinship,”4 and at the risk of delving into the “autobiography of a re-coloured woman” that Martinican student Jane Nardal...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2005) 9 (1): 100–111.
Published: 01 March 2005
... SStephenstephens and Africa, such as the Nardal sisters, René Maran, Tiemeko Garan Kouyaté, and Kojo Tovalou Houénon, and leading African Americans of the Harlem Renaissance, such as W. E. B. Du Bois, Alain Locke, Jessie Fauset, and James Weldon Johnson. Anglophone Caribbean fi gures such as Marcus Garvey...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2005) 9 (1): 120–128.
Published: 01 March 2005
... EEdwardsdwards modalities of transnational and cosmopolitan exchanges. Edwards’s project is an ambitious attempt to limn the contours of black globality by means of an erudite archival exploration of the works of intellectuals and activists such as Paulette Nardal, René Maran, Alain Locke, Tiemoko Garan...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2008) 12 (3 (27)): 119–123.
Published: 01 October 2008
... the meetings at the home of Madame Paulette Nardal, a committed defender of the Antillean and black personality. He met the Senegalese Léopold Sédar Senghor and the Guyanese Léon-Gontran Damas, forming the inseparable trio of Negritude, but above all, in 1939, in what could be called...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (1 (70)): 162–173.
Published: 01 March 2023
.... For the women profiled in the book—Suzanne Césaire, Paulette Nardal, Eugénie Éboué-Tell, Jane Vialle, Andrée Blouin, Aoua Kéita, and Eslanda Robeson—World War II had provided an opening to challenge France on the continuities between the political repression and violence of wartime and the oppression and death...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Small Axe (2005) 9 (1): 112–119.
Published: 01 March 2005
...: pp. 112–119 ISSN 0799-0537 cross-spatial phenomena—two or more nation-states, specifi cally national populations or institutions. Fittingly, the literature, aesthetic, and political criticism generated by fi g- ures such as René Maran, the Nardal sisters, and George Padmore are largely contingent...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2019) 23 (2 (2)): 57–71.
Published: 01 July 2019
... the forgotten female literary history of the movement. As she demonstrates, authors such as Suzanne Césaire and the sisters Jeanne Nardal and Paulette Nardal, despite their pivotal roles in the development of concepts such as black internationalism during the interwar years, have been largely ignored in favor...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2022) 26 (2 (68)): 100–107.
Published: 01 July 2022
... pages and circulating among Black circles in Paris—notably the salon led by Martinican sisters Paulette and Jane Nardal, where students and thinkers from all corners of the Black diaspora met—form the backdrop to a legendary moment. Around 1932, young student Aimé Césaire was walking in the streets...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (1 (70)): 154–161.
Published: 01 March 2023
... in the pages of AWA was pointedly transnational and even stubbornly transimperial. All this would have sounded very familiar to Suzanne Césaire, Paulette Nardal, Eugénie Éboué-Tell, Jane Vialle, Andrée Blouin, Aoua Kéita, and Eslanda Robeson, the remarkable group of seven women whose Black feminist...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (1 (49)): 175–184.
Published: 01 March 2016
... feminist thought and the human, Habeas Viscus ; and Brent Hayes Edwards's key chapter on the editing and production work of Paulette and Jane Nardal, in The Practice of Diaspora . 5 It is this critical trajectory on gender and culture, and cultural form, that I hold with me as I read Alexandra T...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2015) 19 (3 (48)): 91–101.
Published: 01 November 2015
... their instrumental work in this essay, it is important to note that this “line” of engaged Antillean women might also include Martinican educators/writers Paulette (1896–1985) and Jane Nardal (1905–93) and Guadeloupean activist, lawyer, and legislator Gerty Archimède (1909–80). 4 Suzanne Césaire, “Léo...