1-20 of 262 Search Results for

market

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2010) 14 (1 (31)): 30–45.
Published: 01 March 2010
...Rivke Jaffe This paper explores the existence of `ital chic' in Jamaica. A cross between ethical consumerism and the marketing of cool, ital chic represents an aesthetic repertoire and a commercial strategy based on Rastafari. The symbols and aesthetics of a Rastafari lifestyle, or `ital livity...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2012) 16 (1 (37)): 154–167.
Published: 01 March 2012
... what George Soros has called “free market fundamentalism.” The New Poor Law's role in the criminalization of poverty is widely acknowledged. So too was the emergent gospel of free trade strengthened by the British state's “disciplined” response to the Irish famine. Slave owner compensation also...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2014) 18 (1 (43)): 125–137.
Published: 01 March 2014
...Edward Sammons The onset of the Great Recession posed a stern challenge to the prevailing model for better living through globalization. Late in the last decade, after having dominated the theory and practice of policy reform for over thirty years, the market-first doctrine known as neoliberalism...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2015) 19 (2 (47)): 185–196.
Published: 01 July 2015
... central to the formation of Caribbean creative experience, and outlines the discursive field, the art market, and the policy and funding landscape through which Caribbean and diaspora artists move. In response to the discussion of Timed Out in this issue of Small Axe , Wainwright explains the continuing...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2009) 13 (2): 164–184.
Published: 01 July 2009
... trauma, especially in the market-driven context of contemporary Jamaican art. Small Axe Inc. 2009 What Times Are These? Visual Art and Social Crisis in Postcolonial Jamaica Veerle Poupeye Was sind das für Zeiten, wo ein Gespräch über Bäume fast ein Verbrechen ist, weil es ein...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 November 2018) 22 (3 (57)): 105–114.
Published: 01 November 2018
... practices that shaped the texture of freedom. An engagement with travel narratives, specifically attentive to reading against the grain of elite mobilities, is proposed as a means through which to reveal the everyday negotiation of livelihoods. Offering the market as a case study, the essay argues that...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 June 2007) 11 (2): 111–114.
Published: 01 June 2007
...Dave Williams Small Axe Incorporated 2007 Upgrade Dave Williams Who we show ourselves to be has become the obsession of the bewildered. Everything we experience today is identified and very closely associated with some brand or other. Modern marketing communications now dominate...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2003) 7 (1): 95–115.
Published: 01 March 2003
... instance of how artists attempt to use cultural Small Axe 13, March 2003: pp. 95–115 ISSN 0799-0537 value as a means of mediating the hegemonic force of market values in the age of global capitalism. Buju Banton is one of the more successful dancehall-DJs-turned-conscious- vibes...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 June 2007) 11 (2): 63–65.
Published: 01 June 2007
...-fashioned sense. small axe 23 • June 2007 • p 63–65 • ISSN 0799-0537 64 | SX23 • Available At All Leading Stores! SX23 • June 2007 • Christopher Cozier | 65 In the early 1990s the term “marketable historical injury” kept coming up in my specu...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2019) 23 (2 (2)): 80–88.
Published: 01 July 2019
... existing in the mytho-poetics of blood & imagination. Like the dangling of turbans from trees, like the throat of the woman slashed in the cane field, like the five-year-old girl raped aboard the jahaji all in the service of sugar & rum. Who was anointed at Coronation Market...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 October 2008) 12 (3 (27)): 94–104.
Published: 01 October 2008
... essential characteristic of Haiti’s contribution to contemporary culture is undoubtedly constituted by the relatively buoyant international fame of its visual arts, linked especially— since 1944—to the limited market of naïve painting.1 In fact, today in Haiti, there are thirty- five commercial art...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 November 2018) 22 (3 (57)): 68–80.
Published: 01 November 2018
... of plantation crops or their by-products (such as banana and sugar) to overseas metropolitan markets primarily in Europe. In recent decades, the regional agriculture sector has been confronted with unprecedented challenges that have had a significant negative impact on both sectors. The overarching...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 February 2008) 12 (1): 145–156.
Published: 01 February 2008
... factory system in England. It must have been hard to miss the Sunday markets where slaves sold the produce from their provisions grounds, gardens often miles from where they lived and where they had labored during their “holidays” to produce that spectacular “tropical bounty” that...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2014) 18 (2 (44)): 72–79.
Published: 01 July 2014
... types of production: for individual and family consumption, for local and regional markets, and, finally, for export into the international market. It was based on the use of agricultural techniques that drew on a range of sources, stretching perhaps as far back as the canucos of the Taino and including...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2005) 9 (1): 64–79.
Published: 01 March 2005
... multina- tional capital. In a context where the market value of the work most often does not ssmallmall coincide with its literary value, the black literary writer, whether female or male, Afri- aaxexe can, African American, or Caribbean, is being urged to produce commercial material...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2009) 13 (2): 135–142.
Published: 01 July 2009
... invitations to return to the colonial ideal are never buried very deeply in the subtext of tourism marketing materials. The past feeds the present, of course, but in the Caribbean, it lives in the present as well. I examine the ways the sublime becomes real. I am interested in the...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2015) 19 (2 (47)): 127–137.
Published: 01 July 2015
..., mooing like cows and chirping like birds, free birds, not like something caged and restricted but like the wood doves and pigeons that flew from tree to tree or the brightly colored Jacquot that flashed through the dampness of the canopy. She was going to market today. It was Saturday. She would have...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2010) 14 (2 (32)): 184–186.
Published: 01 July 2010
... Lauderdale. He is coauthor of The Latino/a Canon and the Emergence of Post-Sixties Literature (2007), a study of the relationship of politics and the market to contemporary literature from the Hispanic Caribbean diaspora. His essays on Caribbean literature have been published in Journal of West...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 September 2004) 8 (2): 100–118.
Published: 01 September 2004
... market pressures of national and local exhibitions allow curators more latitude to explore “localized” art in ways that separate the commerce of ideas from commerce. All are involved in the slow remapping of the art world. I. VENICE Th ere are numerous prestigious international exhibitions that...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 February 2007) 11 (1): 67–75.
Published: 01 February 2007
... Market.” In Carriacou, Sunday is still market day. In Grenada today market day is Saturday. The ability of the enslaved in Grenada to feed themselves gave them a measure of control and independence, even if symbolic and psychological, by making them less dependent on their masters for their...