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lyric

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Journal Article
Small Axe (2011) 15 (2 (35)): 7–23.
Published: 01 July 2011
... normative discourses in dancehall lyrics. I offer readings of male dance crews at street dances, a comedy interlude at a dancehall club night, and a dancehall video, each of which provides the opportunity to read “the queer” in dancehall culture. Out and Bad: Toward a Queer Performance Hermeneutic in...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (1 (49)): 18–36.
Published: 01 March 2016
... politicized rewritings. This essay proposes an “archaeological” approach to Haitian Creole popular music through the lyrics of several lost Haitian songs of the 1840s and 1850s, recently rediscovered in a Paris archive. While Haitian popular music is inherently engaged in a process of constant evolution, this...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2008) 12 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 February 2008
... selected lyrics of dancehall artistes such as Damian Marley and Super Cat, which are read in terms of Giorgio Agamben's concepts of homo sacer , the state of exception, and the biopolitical paradigm of the camp. Small Axe Incorporated 2008 Notes on the Age of Dis: Reading Kingston through Agamben...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2019) 23 (1 (58)): 17–34.
Published: 01 March 2019
.... 2019 M. NourbeSe Philip lyric Immanuel Kant aesthetic judgment If I had set out to write this poem in the way I often write, that is to tell a story about the Zong , I wouldn’t have done it in the way the work has constructed itself. —M. NourbeSe Philip, in Patricia Saunders...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (3): 161–173.
Published: 01 October 2006
... foreign in the decoding of dancehall culture. I argue that while she appears to accept contradictory forms of meaning within dancehall lyrics, at the same time she rejects the possibility of plural interpretations occasioned by such semantic bifurcation. Secondly, I question Cooper’s assertion that...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (3): 150–160.
Published: 01 October 2006
... the “Re-Cooperation” of Meaning Mike Alleyne The function of metaphor and role-play in Caribbean popular culture is not always fully understood within and outside the indigenous context. Thus, the lyrics of Jamaica’s dancehall DJ’s, taken all too literally, have increasingly...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (3): 174–185.
Published: 01 October 2006
... lifeworld embodied in for example the geography, performance, and performers other than the DJ. Thus, even authors who explicitly try to step outside of this reading, this text, fall into a kind of “music-mania” because the DJs, their lyrics, stage performance, and politics, still form the basis...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (3): 193–204.
Published: 01 October 2006
... rather grand enterprise is quite quickly aborted. Stanley Niaah’s review essay focuses fleetingly on a single chapter, “Slackness Personified: Representations of Female Sexuality in the Lyrics of Bob Marley and Shabba Ranks,” and then mutates into a polemic having very little to do...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2003) 7 (1): 95–115.
Published: 01 March 2003
... its homophobic lyrics. ( e furor launched an interna- tional debate among cultural critics and common citizens about the competing “value” systems of Jamaican culture and those of the global marketplace, most specifi cally the record industry. When called upon to apologize for the...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (1 (49)): 79–91.
Published: 01 March 2016
...), lyrical content (if the tune indeed has lyrics), and the waveforms that underpin and sonically frame song. 2 Black musical aesthetics not only emerge within and against long-standing antiblack practices, they are heard and listened to across and in excess of the positivist workings of antiblack logics...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2010) 14 (2 (32)): 97–110.
Published: 01 July 2010
... such as “Beenie Man” “Buju Banton” and “Ninja Man” for their homophobic lyrics. Their offensive behavior would present an awkward moment in Jamaica’s international relations even as the abolition’s anniversary was pending.2 Their eventual banning from British and American musical...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2014) 18 (1 (43)): 138–148.
Published: 01 March 2014
..., “Test of the French Republic,” 58. 9 The (censored) video of the track can be viewed at www.youtube.com/watch?v=8C8eKAKf5Cw ; a transcript of the French lyrics is available at www.mp3lyrics.org/n/ntm/quest-ce-quon-attend/ (translation mine). 10 Léon-Gontran Damas, “Sur une carte postale...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2008) 12 (3 (27)): 175–178.
Published: 01 October 2008
...- ics of Aimé Césaire (1981), has been identified with the interpretation of Aimé Césaire, the Negritude movement, and broader cultural issues in the Caribbean. His edition of Clayton Eshleman and Annette Smith’s English translation of Césaire, Lyric and Dramatic Poetry, 1946–1982 (1990...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2009) 13 (2): 1–3.
Published: 01 July 2009
... constructiveness, a conjoining of opposites such as that observed, for example, in the contradictoriness of Billie Holiday’s sweet lamentation, “Strange Fruit.” In Holiday’s rendition, we recall, by means of her sad tranquillity, the haunting beauty of the blues delivery conjoined with lyrics (by...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (3): 186–192.
Published: 01 October 2006
... theoretical complexion. Indeed, even theory of the most naïve and politically efficacious type—a simplistic feminist identification of Lady Saw’s lyrics with “internalised sexist norms” arising from patriarchy—draws a cor- rection from Cooper that is couched in the contrast between the American...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2014) 18 (2 (44)): 191–201.
Published: 01 July 2014
... were, to a larger-scale analysis. A dread body is a voicing body, an echoic vessel, in several senses. The concept of dread is integral to Rastafarian thought and more generally to the musical and lyrical sensibility of reggae music. Thinking through sound recognizes the widely held view that...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2012) 16 (3 39): 22–38.
Published: 01 November 2012
... a righteous and sanctified people, singing and chanting down the walls of the city so that their God could possess it. The Creole lyrics went on to name other troubles—hunger, poverty, and sickness—but then declared, “There is nothing Jesus cannot crumble.” In the face of this...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2002) 6 (1): 91–111.
Published: 01 March 2002
... James), in Rough Guide to Reggae ub submerges the reggae rhythm and lyric into abstraction, creating a nonverbal site for the learning and consolidation of “dread” awareness. : e “dub organizer” con- structs aesthetic space through a process of removal, alteration, and layering, where...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2011) 15 (2 (35)): 1–6.
Published: 01 July 2011
... howling like the world-cup football stadium in CapeTown. all the tswana songs & vuvuzelas of whirl- ing. as if they was walkin trees talkin When She finally make the xtreme lyric of the leap upon my back. her teeth weeping deep into the steep tendons of my neck. her long abode of body...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2015) 19 (2 (47)): 85–93.
Published: 01 July 2015
... “whiteness.” 2 In the song, Indiana lyrically engages with issues of race by presenting Haiti and the Dominican Republic as two black siblings united under one father, while in her music video, Indiana visually challenges the homophobic, and masculinist, rendering of Dominican national history by creating...