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hispanophone Caribbean literature

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Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 21–31.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Vanessa Pérez-Rosario This essay introduces the special section “The Idea of Hispanophone Caribbean Studies” with a focus on hispanopone Caribbean literature and how it is situated in the region and in the diaspora. The essay suggests the need for creating spaces of dialogue and communication...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 80–99.
Published: 01 November 2016
... through the trope of the archipelago, challenging the understanding of the Caribbean as discontinuous, isolated, hermetic, and beyond comprehension. Analyzing contemporary art of the hispanophone islands and their diasporas, they reveal shared concerns within the Caribbean archipelago and posit that...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2020) 24 (2 (62)): 1–16.
Published: 01 July 2020
... authors from the francophone, hispanophone, and anglophone Caribbean: Aimé Césaire, Lino Novás Calvo, George Lamming, and V. S. Naipaul. Copyright © 2020 by Small Axe, Inc. 2020 literary infrastructure cultural capital Pascale Casanova Caribbean literature decolonial critique If we...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 147–162.
Published: 01 November 2016
... ). Cultural and linguistic interaction in contact zones or in borderlands of empire like the Caribbean include innovative translators, poets, and theorists of the hispanophone Caribbean diaspora who articulate in-between subjectivity, bilingual poetic forms, and the constant work of cultural translation that...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2014) 18 (1 (43)): 7–21.
Published: 01 March 2014
... York, women's migration everywhere, and interactions between the anglophone and hispanophone Caribbeans in immigrant destinations as key areas for further research. © Small Axe, Inc. 2014 Borderlands are wider than borders, and people make them so. In cases where two states have successfully...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2015) 19 (2 (47)): 78–84.
Published: 01 July 2015
... scholars' above-noted differences in how performance was addressed in the Caribbean and in the US context, I proceeded to ask whether performances of gender and sexual difference, as represented in literature, were transformative or constraining in the hispanophone Caribbean and in its diaspora in the...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2015) 19 (3 (48)): 147–162.
Published: 01 November 2015
... concepts such as Relation and créolisation . The relational understandings of translation that emerge from the Glissantian observation of Caribbean culture and literature deserve greater attention, for they are disruptive of many more conventional understandings of translating as an idea and practice...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 189–198.
Published: 01 November 2016
... Dominican Republic imperialism black feminism masculinity nationalism Maja Horn's complex, concise, and elegant Masculinity after Trujillo: The Politics of Gender in Dominican Literature offers a range of rich points of entry for discussion. A vital contribution to Dominican, Caribbean, and...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2015) 19 (2 (47)): 85–93.
Published: 01 July 2015
...Karen Jaime This essay attends to José E. Muñoz's influence on hispanophone Caribbean studies through the work of Dominican lesbian performance artist Rita Indiana. Jaime argues that in the music video “Da pa' lo' do',” or “There Is Enough for Both,” Indiana uses Muñoz's theory of disidentification...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (1 (52)): 241–249.
Published: 01 March 2017
...: University of Virginia Press, 2011). Dalleo also embraces a Pan-Caribbean approach in his considerations of anglophone, francophone, and hispanophone literature. 6 Marlon James, A Brief History of Seven Killings (New York: Riverhead, 2014). 7 See Marlon James, “From Jamaica to Minnesota to...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (3 (54)): 179–187.
Published: 01 November 2017
... exert considerable influence over what is considered “African.” The very same problem is present in the disturbingly pervasive need to clearly delineate what is “Caribbeanliterature and what is “Latinx” when we consider the hispanophone part of the archipelago. Many of these issues are exacerbated by...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2020) 24 (1 (61)): 22–35.
Published: 01 March 2020
... through the act of being a faithful witness to the insurgent work of Afro-Atlantic writers from the Latinx Caribbean and Equatorial Guinea. Other decolonial, insurgent, and liberatory strategies emerge across the literatures of the Afro-hispanophone Atlantic diasporas. For example, in “Witnessing...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 32–48.
Published: 01 November 2016
... identifying the way forward. Building on the foregoing precedent, the initiative of Small Axe to dedicate a special section to this subject—“The Idea of Hispanophone Caribbean Studies,” edited by Professor Vanessa Pérez-Rosario, a noted scholar of Caribbean and Latino literatures who also serves as the...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (1 (52)): 233–240.
Published: 01 March 2017
... Telephone to Heaven (New York: E. P. Dutton, 1987); Ronald Cummings, “(Trans)Nationalisms, Marronage, and Queer Caribbean Subjectivities,” Transforming Anthropology 18, no. 2 (October 2010):” 169–180; Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley, Thiefing Sugar: Eroticism Between Women in Caribbean Literature (Durham, NC...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (1 (52)): 250–259.
Published: 01 March 2017
... sexuality in anglophone, hispanophone, francophone, and Dutch Caribbean literary and popular culture texts and experiences. The title of the book refers both to human bodies from Caribbean islands and to the islands themselves and the isolation and exotica often attributed to them in representations from...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2008) 12 (2): 149–159.
Published: 01 June 2008
... transformations in the region, as well as the profound impact that Haiti, as the first free black republic and the second free republic in the western hemisphere, resoundingly and undeniably had in the Hispanophone Caribbean islands of Puerto Rico, Cuba, and Santo Domingo; later in the...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2003) 7 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 March 2003
... contests (except in the hispanophone Caribbean). In her fascinating study of brown (mulata) women and Cuban nationalism, Vera Kutzinski notes that the images of brown women were central to the construction of Cuban nationalist discourse in the nineteenth century. Brown women, as...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (1 (52)): 180–198.
Published: 01 March 2017
... states that a Caribbean cultural object presents over time; for me this is not a process—a word that implies forward movement—but a discontinuous series of recurrences, of happenings, whose only law is change. 36 Here, Benítez-Rojo's reading—drawing as it does on the hispanophone Caribbean experience...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2010) 14 (3 (33)): 45–68.
Published: 01 November 2010
...: Anglophone, francophone, hispanophone, créolophone” (“Cinema of the Greater Caribbean: Anglophone, Francophone, Hispanophone, and Creolophone Organiz- ers brought together over thirty local and foreign film professionals to screen films to some eight thousand spectators.23 The 2009...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (1 (52)): 199–210.
Published: 01 March 2017
... anglophone, hispanophone, and Dutch-colonized parts of the Caribbean (and elsewhere in the black Americas). 10 The breadth and intensity of Aimé Césaire's intellectual and artistic network and the deep relationships between the founders of the Negritude movement and artists such as Pablo Picasso...