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Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2011) 15 (2 (35)): 43–58.
Published: 01 July 2011
... between the United States and Haiti and black and white bodies, the film engages with the limits of transracial, heterosexual romance in sex tourism. The impossibility of romance shows that for Haitian citizens, nationalist redemption lies in politics not in transracial intimacies. However, politics is...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2018) 22 (2 (56)): 64–71.
Published: 01 July 2018
... influence—similar to how questions of race and Dominican-Haitian relations have recently been approached by scholars. The essay highlights how the longstanding androcentric focus on Rafael Trujillo’s dictatorship (1930–61) and his heterosexual exploits have given way to a recuperation of Dominican women as...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 June 2006) 10 (2): 1–18.
Published: 01 June 2006
... Caribbean: Alfred Mendes’s Black Fauns (1935) and Jamaica Kincaid’s My Brother (1997).1 These books are more than sixty years apart and are very different in terms of their plots and styles. Yet they intersect in their thematic explorations of sexual identities that do not conform to the heterosexual...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2016) 20 (1 (49)): 92–112.
Published: 01 March 2016
... constitutive part of genre. 8 While it may be tempting to read “Caliban's woman” as a heteronormative and patriarchal slippage, it is perhaps more productive to view it as gesturing toward the racialized inequality of love that Averil Clarke reveals based on empirical data from heterosexual black women's...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 October 2006) 10 (3): 125–139.
Published: 01 October 2006
... male dancers in dancehall culture which tamper with the hegemonic readings of heterosexual masculinity. It then analyzes the empowering and liberating potential of selective manifesta- tions of a “dancehallized” identity which is transmitted from within the disempowering and socially darkened...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 October 2007) 11 (3): 118–129.
Published: 01 October 2007
... postcolonial heteropatriarchy in the Bahamas. She illustrates how the sexual economy of desire materializes as an interdependent system that involves gay as well as heterosexual capital by looking at gay tourism. In Alexander’s schema, “economies of the erotic” are distinguishable from...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2012) 16 (1 (37)): 36–52.
Published: 01 March 2012
... the naming of her bulimia to her entry into heterosexuality and her return to and from Haiti, Sophie’s abrupt and diagnostic revelation, in response to Martine’s ostensibly innocent remark that Sophie “do[esn’t] seem to eat much,” is not entirely unexpected, and several earlier...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2017) 21 (1 (52)): 241–249.
Published: 01 March 2017
... reading representations and experiences of Caribbean heterosexual men and women as well as those of men who desire men, of women who desire women, and of transgender and other non-gender-conforming people, while carefully noting the differences made by the intersections of race, ethnicity, class, and...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2005) 9 (1): 17–39.
Published: 01 March 2005
... the viability of independence as a state for Caribbean nations by using heterosexual relationships as a metaphor. Phillips indicates that his critique of independence from colonial strictures is linked to the representation of “the relationship between the men and the women [as] 30...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2011) 15 (2 (35)): 7–23.
Published: 01 July 2011
..., the other dancehall superstar of the 1990s, exhibited a contrapuntal flair to Bounty’s ghetto high-mindedness. His heterosexuality was always joyful and witty, indulgent and as highly lacquered as his bright yellow Humvee. But even this exuberance was not the same as what I was...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 October 2007) 11 (3): 130–138.
Published: 01 October 2007
... (Any) Body.” 9. Studies along these lines are much more common now, but for an important early analysis of the fiction of Jamaica Kincaid, Michelle Cliff, Patricia Powell and others, see Evelyn O’Callaghan, “‘Compulsory Heterosexuality’ and Textual/Sexual Alternatives in...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 September 2001) 5 (2): 183–185.
Published: 01 September 2001
..., heterosexual on homosexual), but Stolzoff suggests that “the clash usually serves to keep outright vio- lence in check—that is, within the bounds of fair play” (p. 202). < e dancehall mes- sage oscillates between gangsters and Rastas, between slackness and culture themes, and between a willingness to...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 November 2011) 15 (3 (36)): 62–79.
Published: 01 November 2011
... treatment of gender and sexuality are largely enabled through the central character’s performance as a black masculine, heterosexual, hypersexed body. Myriam Chancy’s Spirit of Haiti features four protagonists whose intertwining lives serve as the backdrop for a story about longing...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2018) 22 (2 (56)): 99–114.
Published: 01 July 2018
... through monogamous heterosexual complementarity, a Catholic colonial value that was central to the development of the colonies. By heterosexual complementarity I refer to the ways men and women became defined as separate, distinct, and essentially different, whereby each “needs the other to supply the...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 November 2014) 18 (3 (45)): 1–17.
Published: 01 November 2014
... concludes with Staceyann's difficult decision to choose the greater sexual freedoms available in New York. Jacqui Alexander reminds us, “[Under heteropatriarchy,] erotic autonomy signals danger to the heterosexual family and to the nation. And because loyalty to the nation as a citizen is perennially...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2015) 19 (2 (47)): 85–93.
Published: 01 July 2015
... work by describing her performance of Clarence, a heterosexual, white, gun-toting militiaman. Here, Davis dresses in boy drag, wearing camouflage and putting on a fake beard, with the elastic visibly tucked behind her ears, while speaking in a deep baritone voice. The whiteface enacted by Davis...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2012) 16 (1 (37)): 20–35.
Published: 01 March 2012
...-American cultural and political contexts, and a frustration with the term third gender, which emerged in the mid-1970s to describe operations of gender in cultures that binary models of male/female, heterosexual/homosexual would not or could not fit.4 Although found in earlier writings,5 by the...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2009) 13 (1): 75–89.
Published: 01 March 2009
... Thomas have all had something to say about black masculinity in the public sphere.2 In each case a heterosexual black masculinity is assumed and always found wanting, in that it does not live up to the script of what it should be. These recent, but not new, critiques of black public...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 March 2010) 14 (1 (31)): 46–59.
Published: 01 March 2010
... “within Black heteropatriarchy as outlaw.”7 Not put in the service of a reproductive heterosexuality, the erotic then functions as a dangerous signifier of uncontrolled and uncon- trollable sexuality. Such uncontrollable sexuality makes the gay man even more stigmatized than the...
Journal Article
Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1 July 2011) 15 (2 (35)): 197–208.
Published: 01 July 2011
... conceptualized in terms of women’s bodies and heterosexual intimacy—a naturalization of what is otherwise understood as a violation and therefore problematic. When Thomas talks about governors and other public officials unwinding “from the tension and wear of official duty” in the company “of some...