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Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (3): 54–69.
Published: 01 October 2006
...Ashley Dawson Small Axe Incorporated 2006 Linton Kwesi Johnson’s Dub Poetry and the Political Aesthetics of Carnival in Britain Ashley Dawson British dub poet Linton Kwesi Johnson (LKJ) moved to Britain from Jamaica on the cusp of adolescence in 1963. He arrived in the...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2015) 19 (3 (48)): 65–83.
Published: 01 November 2015
...Phanuel Antwi Rereading dub poetry under the pressures of and with the resources of black feminist and queer theory, and treating the practice of dub poetry as a production of a sound archive, one that embodies and aurally animates the intimacies of the black Atlantic, this essay highlights the...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2018) 22 (1 (55)): 181–190.
Published: 01 March 2018
Journal Article
Small Axe (2002) 6 (1): 91–111.
Published: 01 March 2002
...Philip Maysles Small Axe Incorporated 2002 Dubbing The Nation Philip Maysles It often seems to the outsider that there is an organic connection between the kind of beat, the kind of movement which is made to it, and the silent inner rebellion and frenzy which possess anyone...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2018) 22 (1 (55)): 172–180.
Published: 01 March 2018
... the case that the power of an audible, creole technopoetics, as best embodied by dub reggae, can remake our very conception of the human. In addition to dub, the author brings minstrelsy, blues, jazz, and the like into his broader discussion of black engagements with sound technologies, arguing that...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2020) 24 (3 (63)): 195–205.
Published: 01 November 2020
...Peter James Hudson Held at Montreal’s McGill University from 11 to 14 October 1968, the “Congress of Black Writers: Toward the Second Emancipation—the Dynamics of Black Liberation” was dubbed the largest Black Power conference ever held outside the United States. In Moving Against the System: The...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2014) 18 (2 (44)): 72–79.
Published: 01 July 2014
... famously dubbed the “counterplantation” system. Though resisted by successive Haitian regimes and circumscribed and sapped by the actions of local merchants—who over time became increasingly imbricated with foreign merchants—this system nevertheless offered a high quality of life to the rural population...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2007) 11 (2): 177–183.
Published: 01 June 2007
Journal Article
Small Axe (2012) 16 (3 39): 177–187.
Published: 01 November 2012
Journal Article
Small Axe (2019) 23 (1 (58)): 134–149.
Published: 01 March 2019
... Axe, Inc. 2019 black Britain Caribbean migration reggae music cultural politics Jamaica Rastafari 1970s sufferation dub poetry consciousness identity While this essay is a contribution to a fascinating and timely conversation about Jamaica and the 1970s, I take the view that a...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2003) 7 (2): 23–38.
Published: 01 September 2003
... resistant identities we are studying might transform the public sphere.⁸ I will divide my schematic exploration of the foregoing ideas into two sections: the ssmallmall fi rst will study alternative directions for carnival studies. By way of a discussion of dub aaxexe...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2002) 6 (2): 49–71.
Published: 01 September 2002
... collaboration of the Jamaican Tourist Board, held its fi rst “Jamaica Day” at the Bloor and Yonge subway sta- tion. . e event consisted of performances of “Jamaican culture,” but not of the variety one might expect from living in Toronto given the infl uence of reggae, dancehall, Ras- tafarianism, and dub...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2001) 5 (2): 183–185.
Published: 01 September 2001
... studio [that] remains central to innovations in dancehall culture in the 1990s” (p. 91). < is led to the development of the “cut-n-mix” technique, as “selectors” were brought to the studios to reproduce their dancehall performances, and “dub” tracks began to dominate the music...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2002) 6 (1): v–vii.
Published: 01 March 2002
... level the rich religious experiences of the ordinary Caribbean person. From there we move to dub music. Here, dub is vvii examined as an aural representation of the ways in which the Jamaican subaltern male negotiates identity and belonging. Following this we have an exegesis of a Derek...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (1 (52)): 1–16.
Published: 01 March 2017
... Jamaican Theatre: Highlights of the Performing Arts in the Twentieth Century (Kingston: University of West Indies Press, 2011), 25. 39 The Nomaddz, “Sort Out Yuh Life, Jamaica,” Sort Out Yuh Life, Jamaica! (Extended Play) , Nomaddic Movement, 2011. 38 Michael Bucknor, “Dub Poetry as...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2011) 15 (2 (35)): 1–6.
Published: 01 July 2011
... come catch up w/me in this po em since there was no more options of canticle .no mo pitch. no mo dub. no mo brush. no mo taw. and all the scansion of words i had use had drie- (d) away in the desert 35 • July 2011 • Kamau...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2010) 14 (2 (32)): 150–159.
Published: 01 July 2010
.... 32 • July 2010 • Satch Hoyt  |  151 The multifaceted diaspora within which I reside is a complex hybridization of many cultures, narratives, and belief systems—a mash-up remix, version, dub plate. I was born in London to an Afro-Jamaican father and a white English mother in the late...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2014) 18 (2 (44)): 173–179.
Published: 01 July 2014
... matter there would simply be to reproduce the empirical/semiotic divide the book devotes so much effort to overcoming. If the bass frequencies of dub music are to be heard as in some incorrigible sense “masculine,” as Henriques argues, it does not therefore follow that those lower frequencies cannot be...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (3): 19–36.
Published: 01 October 2006
... of those far-off times in cosmopolitan Trinidad, once dubbed nothing less than “the Paris of the West Indies.” . . . Their glamour they got from the movies of the day; their noble ideals they got from the book-club memberships that brought Lloyd C. Douglas, Pearl Buck, and Emile Zola...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2019) 23 (3 (60)): 34–49.
Published: 01 November 2019
... in the 1960s and 1970s, James’s novel directs readers’ attention to the way dancehall temporality embraces instead what Amiri Baraka, writing in 1966, dubbed the “changing same” of black music, a concept here applied to dancehall’s subaltern competition for new musical articulations of old truths...