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Journal Article
Small Axe (2005) 9 (1): 100–111.
Published: 01 March 2005
... itself, as it shaped both the commonalities black intellectuals shared in their experience of diaspora, and the challenges they faced in communicating their profound diff erences amid racial sameness. Translation is both a literal activity and a theoretical intervention, central to Edwards’s...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2005) 9 (1): 120–128.
Published: 01 March 2005
...- Btions regarding scholarly approaches to the black diaspora: “How do we begin to understand diff erences within black communities? How do we defi ne and refi ne the practice of writing African peoples into a history of overlapping diasporas?”1 Edwards demonstrates, in this impressive work...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2002) 6 (2): 1–24.
Published: 01 September 2002
...) and Contradictory Omens: Cultural Diversity and Integration in the Caribbean (Mona, Jamaica: Savacou, 1974). Small Axe 12, September 2002: pp. 1–24 ISSN 0799-0537 and historical moment, and each has the potential for very diff erent trajectories and ranges of scrutiny. A feature shared by all...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2004) 8 (1 (15)): 1–20.
Published: 01 March 2004
... in racialized electoral violence and community responses to such assaults? How can we account for women’s diff erent responses to violence? How might we begin to realistically construct a viable opposition against all forms of violence against women? I begin by outlining some gendered aftereff ects...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2003) 7 (2): 168–178.
Published: 01 September 2003
... appreciate their comments and the dialogue that these engender. Th e act of reading, as we know, is itself each reader’s encounter with the words on the page. In the particular readings of these commentators, diff erent emphases and new meanings emerge from my text—meanings that are connected...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (1): 59–73.
Published: 01 February 2006
... with a foreign vocabulary always yielding something new and diff erent from the original contexts, owing to the endless Caribbean transculturación Transculturación, the term Furé Davis uses, is particularly apt. It was coined by the Cuban critic Fernando Ortiz. It is an excellent...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2004) 8 (1 (15)): 82–105.
Published: 01 March 2004
..., a critical adaptation of Chatterjee’s framework. One of the most important aspects of the critique of Nationalist Th ought and the Colonial World involves the ontology of culture, an element that is central to Chatterjee’s argument. What I hope to produce is a way of reading the diff erence between...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2003) 7 (2): 23–38.
Published: 01 September 2003
...), 40. 5. Burton, Afro-Creole, 267. 2244 it. In making this contention, one proviso is necessary: it is crucial to remember that carnival in the academy might serve a very diff erent function from that which it serves in Caribbean societies. Th us, although I do not think that carnival...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2002) 6 (1): 133–150.
Published: 01 March 2002
... of marginalization and domination, diff erentia- tion and incorporation. * e state’s practice of solidifying these boundaries, however, often serves as the basis for collective action in order to bring about progressive social change—in other words, grassroots mobilization. Small Axe 11, March 2002: pp...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (1): 106–179.
Published: 01 February 2006
.... Mintz’s border-crossings have led to extraordinary analytical insights, allowing him to refl ect thoughtfully on the commonalities as well as the contrastive diff erences that these varied cases, born of broadly similar though distinct historical experiences, bring to awareness. His work has...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2005) 9 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 March 2005
... as the guarantee of sovereign identity. Rather Stuart’s ssmallmall ethics are founded in and shaped by responsiveness to alterity, to the opacities of other- aaxexe ness, and to the unavoidable risks and ineluctable uncertainties haunting any dialogical encounter, and any hope of belonging-in-diff...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 February 2006
..., and Jobabo, where many migrants from British colonies settled in the early part of the twentieth century. Some eighty years before my visit, these towns were semisegregated settlements composed of diff erent social groups: North Americans, Spaniards, Cubans, and migrants from virtually...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2005) 9 (1): 112–119.
Published: 01 March 2005
... diff erent national-territorial spaces and linguistic communities. Edwards writes early on that “the cultures of black internationalism can be seen only in translation,” in attempts at fashioning both a sense of community as well as an oppositional stance toward the West (p. 7). Th e practice...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2003) 7 (2): 39–70.
Published: 01 September 2003
... in the novel’s structure is unexpected because it breaks into the larger narrative. I fi rst came across it not in Lamming’s novel but in a radically diff erent context: in the 1963 appendix to C. L. R. James’s Th e Black Jacobins.³ I have always been aff ected by James’s afterword...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2005) 9 (1): 129–133.
Published: 01 March 2005
...: Un homme à la recherché d’une patrie (Paris: Présence Africaine, 1994). 3. Aimé Césaire, Cahier d’un retour au pays natal/Return to My Native Land, bilingual edition (Paris: Présence Africaine, 1971), 60–61. 113030 Negritude Women?⁴ Diff erences in methodology and disciplines...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2005) 9 (1): 134–149.
Published: 01 March 2005
... of Michael Hanchard and Nadi Edwards. Th e latter notes that a major concern in the book is precisely the ways that internationalism is fractured by the “diff erent contexts” of nationality. Hanchard, especially in the fi nal pages of his essay, makes it equally clear that the “tension between black...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2003) 7 (2): 159–167.
Published: 01 September 2003
... to settler-administrator in Australia, his participation in a double wedding with a Maori couple in New Zealand, and his stint as lieutenant governor of St. Vincent and Antigua, before his arrival in Jamaica as deputy governor in 1862. Each place elicited a diff erent set of anxieties...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2001) 5 (2): 85–177.
Published: 01 September 2001
..., we must realize that the reason for this silence lies less in their lack of heroism than in the fundamentally diff erent international situation of our time. —Frantz Fanon Men fi ght and lose the battle, and the thing they fought for comes about in spite of their defeat...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2002) 6 (1): 59–76.
Published: 01 March 2002
... otherness of the racial outsider and the contradiction that will haunt the future of West Indian writing: a tacit acceptance of Eurocentric aesthetic norms on the one hand, the awareness of racial diff erences on the other. Williams adopts a universalizing stance to posit the color-blindness of art...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2004) 8 (1 (15)): 123–217.
Published: 01 March 2004
... in the Caribbean because all we mean to ask is, was it your generation or your father’s gen- eration that had a hoe in his hand? Your very family is a mixture of people from diff erent sectors: my father was a middle-class professional; his aunt, who visited all the time, was a domestic worker. My mother...