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Jamaican language politics

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Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (3 (72)): 215–225.
Published: 01 November 2023
..., the author sees hopeful signs that the Jamaican language is gradually gaining national prominence. Jamaican language politics neocolonialism bilingualism gender politics oral tradition Despite their fashionably postmodernist appearance, the parentheses in the title of this essay do not signify...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2014) 18 (1 (43)): 149–160.
Published: 01 March 2014
... orientalist discourse. How, then, does the Jamaican Chinese writer work with and against this site-specific orientalism, and in so doing, contribute to defining and redefining the nation and by extension the Caribbean? What language do these subjects access in order to intervene in these discursive fields...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2010) 14 (2 (32)): 42–55.
Published: 01 July 2010
... of representing Jamaica as an exotic space. So, although The Mighty Quinn supposedly attempts to explore politics and crime at the highest level, it removes the story from the actual center of Jamaican political life and reimagines that space. Xavier Quinn (Denzel Washington) is the chief...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2013) 17 (3 (42)): 63–84.
Published: 01 November 2013
... difficulty with its Jamaican language and descriptions. Though these overwhelmingly sanguine evaluations, as well as their varied racial/national identifications of characters, might reflect a range of interpretations (e.g., African American as a synonym for black ) or inattention to textual details, when...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (3 (54)): 152–166.
Published: 01 November 2017
... as these achievements enabled him to fashion a pronouncedly modernist discourse of cultural and political expression (in a highly cultivated diction, as many will remember), he would never stray far from the idiomatic languages of his social and familial origins among ordinary black Jamaicans. Nettleford always...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2003) 7 (1): 46–71.
Published: 01 March 2003
... of the tenets of Rastafari, its contribution to popular music and language, and its global impact, claiming that he grew up in close proximity—on an adjacent property—to an infl uential Rastafari community, Pinnacle. 5522 acceptance of Jamaican “nation language.” Henzell’s attempts...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (3): 193–204.
Published: 01 October 2006
... “the conceptual territory Cooper’s Sound Clash: Jamaican Dancehall Culture At Large occupies in the context of academic writings on Caribbean popular culture, in particular dancehall culture, and the politics of what is made visible, excessive or absent” (174). But this rather grand...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (3): 111–124.
Published: 01 October 2006
... or less common sense of the signs used in performance.” See Baz Kershaw, The Politics of Performance: Radical Theatre as Cultural Intervention (London and New York: Routledge, 1992), 16. 27. This language is also often referred to as Jamaican Creole, or simply Jamaican...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (3): 150–160.
Published: 01 October 2006
... of mainstream pop commercial success rarely experienced by any Jamaican dancehall artist. Daddy Yankee’s reggaeton 2005 Barrio Fino album (featur- ing the urban hit “Gasolina”) has gone platinum in the US (having sold more than 1 million copies) despite its Spanish language emphasis.3 This unlikely...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2002) 6 (1): 1–30.
Published: 01 March 2002
.... Beverly Lopez, a prominent Jamaican businesswoman, plain- tively says, “[I] recognize that the citizens of this country no longer look to us for a counter point vision or leadership But if there is general agreement that politics and various regional nation-states are in crisis...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (3): 161–173.
Published: 01 October 2006
.... Such thickness of experience might not be readily available to outsiders. It is at the level of language and the authority of the local voice that Cooper thereby resolutely rejects the validity of the external interpretation. This study of Jamaican dancehall culture is stubbornly rooted in a politics...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2010) 14 (2 (32)): 17–41.
Published: 01 July 2010
... insight linking the Jamaican state’s criminalization of ganja back to the legacy of piracy and economic dispossession as “just a shitstem they lay down to belittle the poor.”70 In distinct ways, the languages of political affect invoked by Tosh remain unmapped within current...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (1 (52)): 1–16.
Published: 01 March 2017
... and perhaps this manifestation of the law that he deems to be ignorant, incapable, and ultimately unfair. It is very difficult not to see Jamaican class politics being played out here—Dutty and Protoje (Gavin and Oje) read as “brown,” “uptown” youngsters making a foray into a world that is not quite...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Small Axe (2019) 23 (1 (58)): 134–149.
Published: 01 March 2019
... For the influence of the Jamaican 1970s on black Britain, we need to also look at the fascinating manifestation of language in the cultural evolution of black Britain. Mid-1970s Britain and Jamaica saw the emergence of a new group of poets who unashamedly embraced patwa as a foundational aspect of their poetry...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Small Axe (2004) 8 (2): 154–169.
Published: 01 September 2004
... to the Jamaican national motto “out of many, one people,” I observed that the racial politics of the monument could very well be conceived as “out of one white woman, two stark- naked black people.” And I recalled in the television broadcast the conversation I’d had with Mrs. Facey Cooper...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (2): 61–79.
Published: 01 June 2006
.... Patrick, based on field notes from research in Jamaican Ethnomedicine 1978–1994, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Howard University, Washington, DC. 25. Paula Burnett, Derek Walcott: Politics and Poetics (Gainsville: Florida University Press, 2001), 188. 68 | SX20 • Two Healing...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (1 (49)): 1–16.
Published: 01 March 2016
... of Black Jamaican Creole,” 36 and here this desire find its ideal object in the refined forms of McKay's “language of love.” This conception of linguistic form is tied up as well, though, with a particular theory of racial variation. The idea that these “naïve love-songs” express a sweet Southern...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (3 (72)): 237–245.
Published: 01 November 2023
... a diaspora-born anglophone Caribbean writer feels the claim of Creole. “In Flux,” the first story in Escoffery’s collection If I Survive You , begins with a scene of the Miami-born protagonist Trelawny’s early shame over his parents’ Jamaican language (“Why’s your mother talk so funny?”) and his affirmation...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2004) 8 (2): 100–118.
Published: 01 September 2004
... Poupeye, Modern Jamaican Art (Kingston: Ian Randle Publishers, 1998) and Veerle Poupeye, Caribbean Art (London: Th ames and Hudson, 1998). 110707 Environmental Goods.” With its strong political ties to the overseers...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2003) 7 (2): 1–22.
Published: 01 September 2003
... political theory. And while it is true that not all (per- haps not even many) of its themes have entered directly into the specifi c debates about Jamaican politics, they serve nonetheless to shape (or reshape) the language-game of the political in terms of which theoretical debates...