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Caribbean language politics

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Journal Article
Small Axe (2019) 23 (3 (60)): 50–68.
Published: 01 November 2019
... by positioning Puerto Rican independence as central to a wider decolonial Caribbean and postwar world order. By analyzing Pueblos Hispanos ’s practice of “inter-nationalism”—a term the author proposes to denote the flexible strategy used to mediate between competing political interests and which can serve...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (3 (72)): 226–236.
Published: 01 November 2023
... Dialect Literature and Performance ; Oxford : Oxford University Press , 2022 ; 208 pages; ISBN 978-0192856838 (hardcover) © Small Axe, Inc. 2023 Anglo-Creoles Caribbean language politics decolonizing English vernacular Creole organizes speech as a blast of sound. —Édouard...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2020) 24 (1 (61)): 11–21.
Published: 01 March 2020
... politics as well as the region’s literary history, I focus on texts that represent relationships between Caribbean Creoles and European languages, whether across national boundaries or within national spaces. The first two works I consider explore the relationships between Spanish, French, and Haitian...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2015) 19 (3 (48)): 147–162.
Published: 01 November 2015
... the apparent chaos of the Caribbean—the region's fragmented and insular landmasses, its competing and entangled colonial histories, its various ethnic groups, traditions, politics, and (crucially) languages—there emerges an “island' of paradoxes that repeats itself and gives shape to an unexpected and complex...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2020) 24 (1 (61)): 96–102.
Published: 01 March 2020
... Indies Federation in the twentieth century provoke the following questions: Could we call these two Caribbean confederation projects failures if their centrality in Caribbean political imaginaries suggests otherwise? What are some of the insights that these two projects could offer to Caribbean...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (3 (72)): 237–245.
Published: 01 November 2023
..., to the transcriptions and parodies of White Caribbean elites, and to the increasing use in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries of Creole by Brown and Black Caribbean writers and performers. Slowly, the language shifted from being a marker of cultural inferiority to a medium for signaling cultural authenticity...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2008) 12 (2): 168–178.
Published: 01 June 2008
... is a tricky matter. There are not only conven- tional linguistic divides that balkanize Caribbean thought but also the more critical matter of what constitutes Caribbean ideas and thought, and thus a Caribbean intellectual tradition. Is this tradition constituted primarily of political ideas, literature...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2022) 26 (2 (68)): 80–84.
Published: 01 July 2022
... intellectual traditions and cultural-political identities. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the story of the Caribbean islands is one of changing colonial masters. The old colonial-inspired rivalry has effectively made us opaque to each other across languages in the Caribbean. 4...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 147–162.
Published: 01 November 2016
... and linguistic difference. 1 I agree with Forsdick's claim that translation studies ought to be “Caribbeanized” but would note that a Caribbean intellectual tradition and political imagination has already helped contribute to both the “cultural turn” in translation studies since the 1990s...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2017) 21 (1 (52)): 180–198.
Published: 01 March 2017
... become the de facto homeland for all of its transplanted groups, language can serve to narrow our focus regarding the generation of this creolized Caribbean identitarian framework. With plantation slave labor—outnumbering from early on the white owner component by an average of ten to one—drawn from...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2010) 14 (3 (33)): 89–98.
Published: 01 November 2010
..., and Paris for francophone Caribbean-Haitian writers). In fact, France, the French language, and even Québec’s own struggle for political and linguistic autonomy in Canada are as much “anchored” in and “entangled” with and in the very processes of exchange and inter- action that occur...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2013) 17 (3 (42)): 138–150.
Published: 01 November 2013
... languages that preserves in turn a political space. I conclude by examining the potential and the pitfalls of a poetics of vernacular difficulty, and I argue for an approach to translation that mines its materiality, across and along Caribbean and Latino/American contexts. This graininess...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (1 (70)): 52–58.
Published: 01 March 2023
... historical canon. As more than political activism, the guest editors examine Anton de Kom in this Small Axe platform for Caribbean thought with the hope that these essays will stimulate even more scholarship on De Kom’s life and work and on the Dutch Caribbean more broadly, beyond the borders of the Dutch...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2014) 18 (3 (45)): 90–106.
Published: 01 November 2014
... which literary expression negotiates between the primary languages of the region. In reading for the translative, writing that works between vernaculars or Creoles and dominant European languages, we can identify a distinctly Caribbean mode of expression. In this essay, translative analyses of Derek...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (1): v–ix.
Published: 01 February 2006
... the intra- Caribbean borders of linguistic and cultural diff erences instated by colonialism and reinforced by subsequent political movements. As our call for papers noted: While the language divide . . . has been treated by Caribbean scholars and politicians as para- mount, there are countless...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2013) 17 (3 (42)): 100–112.
Published: 01 November 2013
... understood at different scales: the spatial frame for understanding the original work, in this case the “Caribbean” broadly construed, and the spatial frame for the second language, in this case the American academic market. This means the politics of translation has no inherent promise. It can act to shore...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2004) 8 (2): 205–213.
Published: 01 September 2004
... perspectives, thus enabling a truly transnational approach that incorporates the specifi cs of region, language, period, theme, and methodology into our understanding of créolité and cre- olization. Th e politics and poetics of creoleness and creolization are examined within the Caribbean and Latin...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2004) 8 (2): 214–221.
Published: 01 September 2004
... perspectives, thus enabling a truly transnational approach that incorporates the specifi cs of region, language, period, theme, and methodology into our understanding of créolité and cre- olization. Th e politics and poetics of creoleness and creolization are examined within the Caribbean and Latin...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2004) 8 (2): 222–227.
Published: 01 September 2004
... perspectives, thus enabling a truly transnational approach that incorporates the specifi cs of region, language, period, theme, and methodology into our understanding of créolité and cre- olization. Th e politics and poetics of creoleness and creolization are examined within the Caribbean and Latin...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2011) 15 (2 (35)): 164–173.
Published: 01 July 2011
... nationalist movements such as Pan-Africanism and the Garvey movement to Caribbean political and cultural history; the dominant narrative that presents the Windrush generation of the 1950s as the founders of anglophone Caribbean literature, a literature con- sisting of high-culture novels and poetry...