1-20 of 463 Search Results for

Caribbean Central America

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (3 (72)): 15–31.
Published: 01 November 2023
.../documento/MAM-902032 . 38 “Cada vez que el gobierno no tiene nada que hacer, vienen a buscarme”; quoted in ibid. 39 “Eran como una sola patria”; Laverde Toscano, “La cultura Isleña en la vida de la mujer,” 181. Present-day Caribbean Central America encompasses Belize; the Caribbean...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Small Axe (2021) 25 (3 (66)): 134–146.
Published: 01 November 2021
... epistemological status as the Garifuna homeland associated with ancestral marronage. The author looks at how public performances of Garifuna Settlement Day in Central America and the United States (New York City is home to the largest Garifuna communities outside Central America’s Caribbean coasts) open...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (2 (50)): 106–114.
Published: 01 July 2016
..., and of linking with its counterparts in Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. © Small Axe, Inc. 2016 cultural studies intellectual community Small Axe 's invitation to celebrate its twentieth anniversary has created a moment of pause outside the routine of production to reflect on what journal...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2014) 18 (1 (43)): 7–21.
Published: 01 March 2014
... (to the Spanish-speaking Greater Antilles, now linked to US capital and markets). The bulk of coffee production moved from the Greater Antilles to the circum-Caribbean highlands (Central America, Venezuela, Colombia), demanding seasonal workers from adjacent mestizo and indigenous population clusters. Then banana...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 49–64.
Published: 01 November 2016
... studies. 26 Whether we use a broader definition of the Hispanic Caribbean (encompassing places such as Jamaica or Florida or Trinidad or New Orleans, or parts of Venezuela, Colombia, and Central America) or a more traditional one limited to the three Spanish territories of the Greater Antilles...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 65–79.
Published: 01 November 2016
... as the insistence on the strategic location of archipelagoes as central in navigational routes of the period. The Caribbean was the first step in the development of the Spanish imperial enterprise in the Americas, and as such it served as an important laboratory for future practices of exploitation, expansion...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2014) 18 (1 (43)): 22–37.
Published: 01 March 2014
... and susu in Jamaica, box hand in Guyana, and eso in Haiti. 7 My focus is primarily on the history of commercial and investment banking and, secondarily, central banking and savings institutions. Despite the pervasiveness of financial institutions in the history of the Caribbean, there have been...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (2): 261–268.
Published: 01 June 2006
... to be black in the world. The importance of this book is that it brings to the fore a relationship not often acknowledged: the centrality, not simply the influence, of the African American experience in Caribbean thought. Indeed, it seems that the Caribbean has found it difficult...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (2): 269–275.
Published: 01 June 2006
... to be black in the world. The importance of this book is that it brings to the fore a relationship not often acknowledged: the centrality, not simply the influence, of the African American experience in Caribbean thought. Indeed, it seems that the Caribbean has found it difficult...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (2): 276–286.
Published: 01 June 2006
... to be black in the world. The importance of this book is that it brings to the fore a relationship not often acknowledged: the centrality, not simply the influence, of the African American experience in Caribbean thought. Indeed, it seems that the Caribbean has found it difficult...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2006) 10 (2): 287–289.
Published: 01 June 2006
... to be black in the world. The importance of this book is that it brings to the fore a relationship not often acknowledged: the centrality, not simply the influence, of the African American experience in Caribbean thought. Indeed, it seems that the Caribbean has found it difficult...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (1 (49)): 129–145.
Published: 01 March 2016
... the figure of the non-norm, a central category for Wynter throughout the manuscript. The black presence in the New World is subterranean but omnipresent, fugitive but hypervisible, condemned as the non-norm and nonperson but the foundation for the concept of free citizenship in the Americas. Black experience...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 21–31.
Published: 01 November 2016
..., understand the study of the hispanophone Caribbean in relation to the wider archipelago (including the relationship to the francophone and the anglophone Caribbean), the littoral Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States? Our vision is interdisciplinary and intertextual. Our hope is to contribute...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2013) 17 (2 (41)): 43–57.
Published: 01 July 2013
... the formation of cultural studies in Europe and North America. To this end, the author sketches a number of overlapping traditions of writing on culture in the Caribbean that take us from the late nineteenth century and considers the work of two Caribbean theorists, C. L. R. James and Sylvia Wynter...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2023) 27 (2 (71)): 75–85.
Published: 01 July 2023
... class in the Americas (“Novel and History, Plot and Plantation,” 95–102). See also Wynter’s critique of “the [Creole] eye of the evader,” where “creolism” meant an obfuscation of Africa in the Caribbean, in a blistering review of the practice of literary criticism at Mona: Sylvia Wynter, “Creole...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2014) 18 (1 (43)): 72–86.
Published: 01 March 2014
... studies migration between the Caribbean and Western Europe or North America rather than within the Caribbean. 12 Extraregional linkages also mark comparative history, with several prominent historians of Caribbean slavery and abolition comparing Cuba with the US South, Brazil, or mainland Spanish...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2016) 20 (3 (51)): 80–99.
Published: 01 November 2016
... of the region, both historically and in the popular imagination. Other geographic markers are subject to debate. Is the Gulf of Mexico Caribbean? Northeast Brazil? Bermuda? Venezuela? Central America? How do we delineate the hispanophone Caribbean? The sea itself has been known by many names, including North...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2018) 22 (1 (55)): 71–84.
Published: 01 March 2018
... bridged by the common origins of various West and Central African peoples planted on the shores of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea in the fertile belly of the Americas, the American South and the (Southern) Caribbean also share a later history of interconnection that is certainly less forcefully...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2015) 19 (3 (48)): 147–162.
Published: 01 November 2015
... of this: in the immediate aftermath of the disaster, nearly all lines of communication collapsed, with the notable exception of the text messaging service provided by Digicel, the largest mobile phone network provider in the Caribbean and Central America. A digital platform was developed for sharing information via texting...
Journal Article
Small Axe (2009) 13 (2): 210–217.
Published: 01 July 2009
... and North America because of its history of colonialism, slavery, and plantation-based export-oriented agricultural production. In short, the Caribbean was not comprised of primitive others, and the region was thus seen as distinct from other areas that anthropologists studied...